Wellness communities
Europe


In Part 2 of our series, Jane Kitchen takes a look at wellness communities in Europe and profiles some of the biggest projects in development

From Spa Business 2017 issue 2 . . BY Jane Kitchen, Spa Business and Spa Opportunities

The Global Wellness Institute has estimated wellness real estate to be a US$118.6bn (€107bn, £95bn) sector that’s growing at a rate of nearly 20 per cent, with communities cropping up worldwide. This has spurred a GWI Initiative on wellness communities, as well as the first-ever dedicated research report on the subject, to be released at this year’s Global Wellness Summit at The Breakers in Palm Springs, Florida in October. “There’s a big shift in the growth of wellness communities, but they’re not evenly distributed around the world, and there are many different drivers and value systems for them,” says Ophelia Yeung, GWI’s senior research fellow, who will be co-authoring the report.

The GWI Initiative put together a white paper last year, which helped to define the category. The committee determined that at a minimum, in order to deem a community “well,” it must feature some kind of environmental consciousness, with sustainable development and operating practices; have a commitment to holistic health and wellness through programmes and facilities that encourage residents to proactively take care of themselves; and must foster social connections.

Return on investment
Wellness communities are ultimately real-estate assets that are designed to generate a return on investment. Research and experience suggest that people will pay more for healthier, sustainable living options if they’re designed and positioned correctly. “We’ve seen not only an increase in consumer demand for health and wellness-related products and services across all segments of the economy, but also an overall willingness to pay a premium, particularly when it concerns where one lives,” says Mia Kyricos, chair of the GWI Initiative on wellness communities and founder of strategic advisory firm Kyricos & Associates.

Ingo Schweder, CEO of GOCO Hospitality, which is developing several wellness communities around the world (see Kaiserhof Rügen, p 72), says that properties in wellness communities can sell anywhere between 7 to 25 per cent more than average – but that there are also higher costs in building them. Putting aside more land for walking trails, building with green materials and setting up on-site organic farms all add extra benefits, but they also add extra expense.

Kyricos notes that while most real estate is positioned somewhere between luxury address and value for money, wellness communities are instead set to be positioned as unique. “Market disruptors sell uniqueness first, and we believe that wellness communities – real estate ultimately developed with the optimum health of our planet and its citizens – are indeed disruptive,” she explains.

Steve Nygren, founder of US-based wellness community Serenbe, says his community has seen a reduction in school absences, which he believes is tied to Serenbe’s school design. “Research is just coming out tying the built environment to improved health, and once this is better documented and tied to cost savings that can be measured, we will see a lot more happen in this space,” he says.

Schweder agrees that the industry is young and sure to see growth as it evolves. “The model is in evolution right now,” he explains. “It’s a big business, but it’s not necessarily practiced and proven.”

Existing models
There are a few communities that have been in place for several years that the industry can look to. In South London, BedZED is a large-scale, mixed-use sustainable community that’s been a model for low-carbon, environmentally friendly housing for 15 years. Completed in 2001 by Peabody Trust in partnership with Bioregional, it’s also a showcase for how removing car parks and increasing opportunities to walk and cycle can not only help residents be healthier, but can also foster socialisation and reduce consumption. “Our biggest takeaway is that simple strategies work better than complex ones,” says Ben Gill, technical manager for Bioregional. “Our biggest success has been in showing that a more sustainable way of living can be a better way of living.”

Gill reports that two-thirds of residents at BedZED say they’ve been influenced to change their behaviour about cycling and eating. And in Washinton at Seattle’s Grow Community, another Bioregional project that launched in 2010, a survey suggests residents experienced an 85 per cent increase in walking and 31 per cent increase in biking after moving in. All this translates on some level to a place people are willing to pay a premium to live in; at BedZED, properties sell for up to 20 per cent more than the local average.

While BedZED has a community centre that offers things like dance, yoga and karate, it doesn’t have a dedicated spa or wellness facility, due mostly to its size – though Gill wonders if there are spa elements that can be scaled down for the location. BedZED does tick the wellness community boxes when it comes to social connections. Gill says that residents know on average more than 20 neighbours by name, compared with a UK national average of eight – which points to a significantly more connected community.

Professor Terry Stevens, founder and managing director of UK-based consultancy Stevens & Associates, says that many of the attributes in today’s wellness communities are actually things that were taken for granted 100 years ago, when people lived in smaller communities that naturally offered things like social connections. “Somewhere in this model of a traditional community, we find what it is we’re looking for on this new horizon,” he says. Looking back 100 years reveals another model, says Stevens: every village had a doctor, who was as interested in the prevention of illness and disease as in the treatment of it. “We have turned our doctors into institutions,” he says. “And there’s a huge opportunity for spas to move into this.”

Historical European model
Many areas of Europe have a long tradition of health and wellness being integrated into daily life, from historic spa towns in Germany, to the government-funded Soviet-era sanatoriums, to thalassotherapy facilities in France. Throughout many European countries, cities with spas or thermal mineral waters at their hearts are often given special designations or names – ‘terme’ in Italy, Lázn? in the Czech Republic, and, of course ‘spa’ in England – and have a long history of visitors “taking the waters” for their health. But perhaps nowhere is this more prevalent than in Eastern Europe, where natural resources like thermal springs and healing muds run thick – Bulgaria alone boasts more than 500 mineral springs.

“The concept of a wellness community is very much comparable to the spa cities that are so common in Eastern Europe,” says Alla Sokolova, CEO of Latvian-based wellness consultancy Inbalans Group and chair of the Global Wellness Institute’s initiative on Eastern Europe. Spa cities are historic areas or regions that promote wellbeing or health – often built up more than 100 years ago around health-related natural resources like thermal waters, mud or salt caves – and Sokolova explains that these spa cities need to contain the infrastructure and availability of natural resources in order to be classified as such.

In Poland, towns ending in the suffix -zdroj – which translates as ‘health’ – are dotted across the country, a reminder of the country’s wellness roots. Slovenia, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia all have similar towns. During Soviet times, science played a major part in these spa cities, when many were established as research institutes. Now, says Sokolova, they’re “in need of modernisation and a boost of investment. With the rise of the popularity of the concept of the wellness community, the whole post-Soviet block is in a similar situation, and there’s a big opportunity to attract foreign investment in developing these villages – and to open doors to new international travellers. The history and the heritage makes these towns very authentic – there’s an opportunity for really strong positioning.”

Sokolova also says there’s an opportunity for public/private investments for developers, as EU investment funds are sometimes available, and local governments are keen to redevelop these areas. She’s involved in one such wellness project outside of Riga, Latvia (see Kemeri Park, p 70).

Kyricos says that because of Europe’s long wellness history, residents may find wellness communities easy to relate to. “The business of spa and wellness has a great opportunity to reinvent itself in a highly profitable way within a wellness community,” she says. “Spas have an incredible opportunity to not just exist at the side of things, but to live at the very heart of these communities.”


ReGen Village - The Netherlands
Opening: 2018


 

James Ehrlich, ReGen
 

ReGen Villages is a tech-integrated real estate development company that’s creating a new kind of wellness community – a regenerative model for eco-communities with self-sustaining energy and food. The first community is being developed in Almere, The Netherlands, with 300 homes, and other developments are also being considered in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Germany and Belgium. ReGen raises investment from wealth funds looking to divest from fossil fuels and then partners with local municipalities to develop the communities.

“ReGen Villages is engineering and facilitating the development of off-grid, integrated and resilient neighbourhoods that power and feed self-reliant families around the world,” says founder James Ehrlich. “It’s all about applied technology. We’re simply applying already existing technologies into an integrated community design, providing clean energy, water and food right off your doorstep.”

The idea for the communities is to address the challenges of a growing population, increasing urbanisation, scarcity of resources and the growing global food crisis – as well as reducing global CO2 emissions and reducing burdens on municipal and national governments. It also wants to create a sense of community, reconnect people with nature and consumption with production and restore biodiversity to the surrounding landscapes. “We like to think of ReGen as the Tesla of ecovillages,” says Ehrlich. “We want to make it easy, convenient and accessible to choose a sustainable lifestyle off the grid.”

A community centre will include space for yoga, meditation and other wellness curriculum, and Erlich says there could be opportunities for spas to be part of the community.


"We want to make it easy, convenient and accessible to choose a sustainable lifestyle off the grid" - James Ehrlich, ReGen

 


EFFEKT Architects

ReGen Village

Kemeri Park - Latvia
Opening: first stage, 2018


 

Alla Sokolova, Inbalans group
 

Latvian wellness consultancy Inbalans Group is working together with Linser Hospitality, Moscow-based international development company Griffin Partners and Jurmula City Council to develop a substantial wellness community in Latvia's Kemeri National Park.

The wellness community, located just west of capital of Riga, will include a five-star hotel with a 1,500sq m (16,146sq ft) spa that’s due to open in 2018. There will also be a wellness clinic comprised of multiple historic buildings and with a focus on balneotherapy treatments, which is due to open in 2022. Linser Hospitality is spearheading the strategic development and the health, medical and wellness concept for both hotels, plus providing pre-opening, staffing and training for the existing hotel.

The local population includes about 2,000 people. A public/private investment plan between the Jurmula City Council and Griffin Partners has been set up to revitalise the existing community, adding in activities and infrastructure to promote health and wellbeing and community living, and redevelop existing houses. Down the line, there’s a vision to build a school, sports ground and a new, modern residential wellness facility.

The village will also include fertility, sleep and performance programmes, and the hotel will feature balneotherapy suites and a mineral water inhalation centre, in addition to the 12-treatment-room spa.

Kemeri is a source of natural mineral waters and curative muds, and has been a wellness destination since the 16th century. The five-star hotel is being developed in a historic 1936 health resort building that was originally built by Riga architect Eižens Laube as a symbol of Latvia’s first independence.

There are also plans to create a “knowledge centre” in the national park that will host interactive exhibitions on science and natural history. The “Laboritorium” will allow guests – and children – to test the muds and waters and “understand the compositions and what it takes for a source to become healing,” says Sokolova. The knowledge centre will also include art and performance pavilions and will serve as a base for working groups to come together to initiate research programmes on topics such as health and lifestyle. Bicycle and walking routes will be developed through the community and park, and the city infrastructure will be developed using evidence-based principles of creating healthy communities.


"This will be a different kind of luxury experience, based on local heritage and using healing sources" - Alla Sokolova, Inbalans group

 



Kemeri Park will include a wellness community alongside a five-star hotel
Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village - Wales

Opening: late 2019

The Welsh government is funding a masterplan for a multi-million-pound wellness village in South Wales. The Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village is located on the Carmarthenshire coast and will include an education centre to deliver training and skills development in the wellbeing arena. The Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellness and wellbeing by pairing health, research and life science with leisure opportunities.

The development will include a wellness hotel, a sports and wellbeing centre and the Institute of Life Science (ILS) focusing on near market-ready research and innovation. On-site communities will focus on healthy living, rehabilitation and respite and include suitable living environments for people with disabilities to live with their families and friends and a community health hub offering an integrated facility for primary and community care and associated research activity. There are also plans for a wellness primary school.
The project was conceived as a result of a Global Wellness Roundtable held at Swansea University last year. Dr Franz Linser, managing partner of Linser Hospitality – who spoke at the event – advised the team early on about the spa concept.

 



Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village could transform the region
GOCO Retreat - Kaiserhof Rügen

Opening: 2018

Spa and wellness consultancy and management company GOCO Hospitality has plans to develop a GOCO Retreat on the German island of Rügen, located on the Baltic coast and known for its sandy beaches, quiet lagoons and dramatic peninsulas. Subject to planning permission, the GOCO Retreat Kaiserhof Rügen will be located in the southeastern part of the island, on a site originally owned by the Prussian statesman Otto von Bismarck.

Designed by Berlin-based Frank Architectural Design, the mixed-use wellness development will include a 50-bedroom wellness retreat and 54 wellness condominiums, and will offer views over the famous Sellin Pier and the Baltic Sea. The 3,544sq m (38,147sq ft) on-site wellness centre will include 42 treatment rooms, heat and water experiences, a medispa, gym, mind and body studio, health restaurant, tea lounge, library and meeting and learning spaces.

 



Kasierhof Rügen is located on a site once owned by Otto von Bismarck
 


Kasierhof Rügen is located on a site once owned by Otto von Bismarck
 
 


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Spa Business
2017 issue 2

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Spa Business - Europe

Wellness communities

From Spa Business 2017 issue 2
Europe


In Part 2 of our series, Jane Kitchen takes a look at wellness communities in Europe and profiles some of the biggest projects in development

Jane Kitchen, Spa Business and Spa Opportunities
London’s BedZED is a mixed-use community that’s been a model for low-carbon, sustainable housing for 15 years

The Global Wellness Institute has estimated wellness real estate to be a US$118.6bn (€107bn, £95bn) sector that’s growing at a rate of nearly 20 per cent, with communities cropping up worldwide. This has spurred a GWI Initiative on wellness communities, as well as the first-ever dedicated research report on the subject, to be released at this year’s Global Wellness Summit at The Breakers in Palm Springs, Florida in October. “There’s a big shift in the growth of wellness communities, but they’re not evenly distributed around the world, and there are many different drivers and value systems for them,” says Ophelia Yeung, GWI’s senior research fellow, who will be co-authoring the report.

The GWI Initiative put together a white paper last year, which helped to define the category. The committee determined that at a minimum, in order to deem a community “well,” it must feature some kind of environmental consciousness, with sustainable development and operating practices; have a commitment to holistic health and wellness through programmes and facilities that encourage residents to proactively take care of themselves; and must foster social connections.

Return on investment
Wellness communities are ultimately real-estate assets that are designed to generate a return on investment. Research and experience suggest that people will pay more for healthier, sustainable living options if they’re designed and positioned correctly. “We’ve seen not only an increase in consumer demand for health and wellness-related products and services across all segments of the economy, but also an overall willingness to pay a premium, particularly when it concerns where one lives,” says Mia Kyricos, chair of the GWI Initiative on wellness communities and founder of strategic advisory firm Kyricos & Associates.

Ingo Schweder, CEO of GOCO Hospitality, which is developing several wellness communities around the world (see Kaiserhof Rügen, p 72), says that properties in wellness communities can sell anywhere between 7 to 25 per cent more than average – but that there are also higher costs in building them. Putting aside more land for walking trails, building with green materials and setting up on-site organic farms all add extra benefits, but they also add extra expense.

Kyricos notes that while most real estate is positioned somewhere between luxury address and value for money, wellness communities are instead set to be positioned as unique. “Market disruptors sell uniqueness first, and we believe that wellness communities – real estate ultimately developed with the optimum health of our planet and its citizens – are indeed disruptive,” she explains.

Steve Nygren, founder of US-based wellness community Serenbe, says his community has seen a reduction in school absences, which he believes is tied to Serenbe’s school design. “Research is just coming out tying the built environment to improved health, and once this is better documented and tied to cost savings that can be measured, we will see a lot more happen in this space,” he says.

Schweder agrees that the industry is young and sure to see growth as it evolves. “The model is in evolution right now,” he explains. “It’s a big business, but it’s not necessarily practiced and proven.”

Existing models
There are a few communities that have been in place for several years that the industry can look to. In South London, BedZED is a large-scale, mixed-use sustainable community that’s been a model for low-carbon, environmentally friendly housing for 15 years. Completed in 2001 by Peabody Trust in partnership with Bioregional, it’s also a showcase for how removing car parks and increasing opportunities to walk and cycle can not only help residents be healthier, but can also foster socialisation and reduce consumption. “Our biggest takeaway is that simple strategies work better than complex ones,” says Ben Gill, technical manager for Bioregional. “Our biggest success has been in showing that a more sustainable way of living can be a better way of living.”

Gill reports that two-thirds of residents at BedZED say they’ve been influenced to change their behaviour about cycling and eating. And in Washinton at Seattle’s Grow Community, another Bioregional project that launched in 2010, a survey suggests residents experienced an 85 per cent increase in walking and 31 per cent increase in biking after moving in. All this translates on some level to a place people are willing to pay a premium to live in; at BedZED, properties sell for up to 20 per cent more than the local average.

While BedZED has a community centre that offers things like dance, yoga and karate, it doesn’t have a dedicated spa or wellness facility, due mostly to its size – though Gill wonders if there are spa elements that can be scaled down for the location. BedZED does tick the wellness community boxes when it comes to social connections. Gill says that residents know on average more than 20 neighbours by name, compared with a UK national average of eight – which points to a significantly more connected community.

Professor Terry Stevens, founder and managing director of UK-based consultancy Stevens & Associates, says that many of the attributes in today’s wellness communities are actually things that were taken for granted 100 years ago, when people lived in smaller communities that naturally offered things like social connections. “Somewhere in this model of a traditional community, we find what it is we’re looking for on this new horizon,” he says. Looking back 100 years reveals another model, says Stevens: every village had a doctor, who was as interested in the prevention of illness and disease as in the treatment of it. “We have turned our doctors into institutions,” he says. “And there’s a huge opportunity for spas to move into this.”

Historical European model
Many areas of Europe have a long tradition of health and wellness being integrated into daily life, from historic spa towns in Germany, to the government-funded Soviet-era sanatoriums, to thalassotherapy facilities in France. Throughout many European countries, cities with spas or thermal mineral waters at their hearts are often given special designations or names – ‘terme’ in Italy, Lázn? in the Czech Republic, and, of course ‘spa’ in England – and have a long history of visitors “taking the waters” for their health. But perhaps nowhere is this more prevalent than in Eastern Europe, where natural resources like thermal springs and healing muds run thick – Bulgaria alone boasts more than 500 mineral springs.

“The concept of a wellness community is very much comparable to the spa cities that are so common in Eastern Europe,” says Alla Sokolova, CEO of Latvian-based wellness consultancy Inbalans Group and chair of the Global Wellness Institute’s initiative on Eastern Europe. Spa cities are historic areas or regions that promote wellbeing or health – often built up more than 100 years ago around health-related natural resources like thermal waters, mud or salt caves – and Sokolova explains that these spa cities need to contain the infrastructure and availability of natural resources in order to be classified as such.

In Poland, towns ending in the suffix -zdroj – which translates as ‘health’ – are dotted across the country, a reminder of the country’s wellness roots. Slovenia, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia all have similar towns. During Soviet times, science played a major part in these spa cities, when many were established as research institutes. Now, says Sokolova, they’re “in need of modernisation and a boost of investment. With the rise of the popularity of the concept of the wellness community, the whole post-Soviet block is in a similar situation, and there’s a big opportunity to attract foreign investment in developing these villages – and to open doors to new international travellers. The history and the heritage makes these towns very authentic – there’s an opportunity for really strong positioning.”

Sokolova also says there’s an opportunity for public/private investments for developers, as EU investment funds are sometimes available, and local governments are keen to redevelop these areas. She’s involved in one such wellness project outside of Riga, Latvia (see Kemeri Park, p 70).

Kyricos says that because of Europe’s long wellness history, residents may find wellness communities easy to relate to. “The business of spa and wellness has a great opportunity to reinvent itself in a highly profitable way within a wellness community,” she says. “Spas have an incredible opportunity to not just exist at the side of things, but to live at the very heart of these communities.”


ReGen Village - The Netherlands
Opening: 2018


 

James Ehrlich, ReGen
 

ReGen Villages is a tech-integrated real estate development company that’s creating a new kind of wellness community – a regenerative model for eco-communities with self-sustaining energy and food. The first community is being developed in Almere, The Netherlands, with 300 homes, and other developments are also being considered in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Germany and Belgium. ReGen raises investment from wealth funds looking to divest from fossil fuels and then partners with local municipalities to develop the communities.

“ReGen Villages is engineering and facilitating the development of off-grid, integrated and resilient neighbourhoods that power and feed self-reliant families around the world,” says founder James Ehrlich. “It’s all about applied technology. We’re simply applying already existing technologies into an integrated community design, providing clean energy, water and food right off your doorstep.”

The idea for the communities is to address the challenges of a growing population, increasing urbanisation, scarcity of resources and the growing global food crisis – as well as reducing global CO2 emissions and reducing burdens on municipal and national governments. It also wants to create a sense of community, reconnect people with nature and consumption with production and restore biodiversity to the surrounding landscapes. “We like to think of ReGen as the Tesla of ecovillages,” says Ehrlich. “We want to make it easy, convenient and accessible to choose a sustainable lifestyle off the grid.”

A community centre will include space for yoga, meditation and other wellness curriculum, and Erlich says there could be opportunities for spas to be part of the community.


"We want to make it easy, convenient and accessible to choose a sustainable lifestyle off the grid" - James Ehrlich, ReGen

 


EFFEKT Architects

ReGen Village

Kemeri Park - Latvia
Opening: first stage, 2018


 

Alla Sokolova, Inbalans group
 

Latvian wellness consultancy Inbalans Group is working together with Linser Hospitality, Moscow-based international development company Griffin Partners and Jurmula City Council to develop a substantial wellness community in Latvia's Kemeri National Park.

The wellness community, located just west of capital of Riga, will include a five-star hotel with a 1,500sq m (16,146sq ft) spa that’s due to open in 2018. There will also be a wellness clinic comprised of multiple historic buildings and with a focus on balneotherapy treatments, which is due to open in 2022. Linser Hospitality is spearheading the strategic development and the health, medical and wellness concept for both hotels, plus providing pre-opening, staffing and training for the existing hotel.

The local population includes about 2,000 people. A public/private investment plan between the Jurmula City Council and Griffin Partners has been set up to revitalise the existing community, adding in activities and infrastructure to promote health and wellbeing and community living, and redevelop existing houses. Down the line, there’s a vision to build a school, sports ground and a new, modern residential wellness facility.

The village will also include fertility, sleep and performance programmes, and the hotel will feature balneotherapy suites and a mineral water inhalation centre, in addition to the 12-treatment-room spa.

Kemeri is a source of natural mineral waters and curative muds, and has been a wellness destination since the 16th century. The five-star hotel is being developed in a historic 1936 health resort building that was originally built by Riga architect Eižens Laube as a symbol of Latvia’s first independence.

There are also plans to create a “knowledge centre” in the national park that will host interactive exhibitions on science and natural history. The “Laboritorium” will allow guests – and children – to test the muds and waters and “understand the compositions and what it takes for a source to become healing,” says Sokolova. The knowledge centre will also include art and performance pavilions and will serve as a base for working groups to come together to initiate research programmes on topics such as health and lifestyle. Bicycle and walking routes will be developed through the community and park, and the city infrastructure will be developed using evidence-based principles of creating healthy communities.


"This will be a different kind of luxury experience, based on local heritage and using healing sources" - Alla Sokolova, Inbalans group

 



Kemeri Park will include a wellness community alongside a five-star hotel
Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village - Wales

Opening: late 2019

The Welsh government is funding a masterplan for a multi-million-pound wellness village in South Wales. The Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village is located on the Carmarthenshire coast and will include an education centre to deliver training and skills development in the wellbeing arena. The Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellness and wellbeing by pairing health, research and life science with leisure opportunities.

The development will include a wellness hotel, a sports and wellbeing centre and the Institute of Life Science (ILS) focusing on near market-ready research and innovation. On-site communities will focus on healthy living, rehabilitation and respite and include suitable living environments for people with disabilities to live with their families and friends and a community health hub offering an integrated facility for primary and community care and associated research activity. There are also plans for a wellness primary school.
The project was conceived as a result of a Global Wellness Roundtable held at Swansea University last year. Dr Franz Linser, managing partner of Linser Hospitality – who spoke at the event – advised the team early on about the spa concept.

 



Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village could transform the region
GOCO Retreat - Kaiserhof Rügen

Opening: 2018

Spa and wellness consultancy and management company GOCO Hospitality has plans to develop a GOCO Retreat on the German island of Rügen, located on the Baltic coast and known for its sandy beaches, quiet lagoons and dramatic peninsulas. Subject to planning permission, the GOCO Retreat Kaiserhof Rügen will be located in the southeastern part of the island, on a site originally owned by the Prussian statesman Otto von Bismarck.

Designed by Berlin-based Frank Architectural Design, the mixed-use wellness development will include a 50-bedroom wellness retreat and 54 wellness condominiums, and will offer views over the famous Sellin Pier and the Baltic Sea. The 3,544sq m (38,147sq ft) on-site wellness centre will include 42 treatment rooms, heat and water experiences, a medispa, gym, mind and body studio, health restaurant, tea lounge, library and meeting and learning spaces.

 



Kasierhof Rügen is located on a site once owned by Otto von Bismarck
 


Kasierhof Rügen is located on a site once owned by Otto von Bismarck
 

Originally published in Spa Business magazine 2017 issue 2

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd