Letters

Do you have a strong opinion, or disagree with somebody else’s point of view on topics related to the spa industry? If so, Spa Business would love to hear from you. Email your letters, thoughts and suggestions to theteam@spabusiness.com

‘Well-washing’ confusing developers and consumers
Ingo Schweder, Managing Director, Horwath HTL Health and Wellness
Ingo Schweder

I was interested to see Spa Business’ latest feature on the growth of wellness rooms in hotels last issue. Although brands from Marriott, to Hilton to InterContinental are increasingly incorporating elements of wellness in their hotels, an all-encompassing offering tends to be overlooked.

To place the health and wellbeing of wellness travellers at centre stage, today’s hospitality operators are required to think one step ahead. When developing a wellness-centric property, hospitality experts have to take into account the choice of materials, colour and textures, use of biophilic design standards, incorporation of nature into overall architecture, and creating social spaces that inspire connections and engagement.

To adhere to the core principles of wellness travel – to proactively maintain or improve personal health and wellness – results-driven, multi-day programmes are also necessary.

The handful of true wellness resorts which do exist, however, demonstrate that there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach. Some specialise in a single treatment modality, while others offer a multifaceted approach. Some offer general pampering packages, while others focus on serious, health-focused programmes.

In a new white paper – Wellness-Themed vs Wellness Hospitality – the Horwath HTL Health and Wellness team from Bangkok identifies true wellness resorts and compares them to wellness-themed hotels. It also clarifies key industry terms and sets standards for the wellness hospitality industry because the reality is that merely highlighting healthy features or amenities is ‘well-washing’ and confuses developers and consumers alike.

To download a full copy of the report, visit www.horwathhtl.com/publications/

Short cancer therapy courses are concerning
Amanda Winwood, owner, Made for Life Organics
Amanda Winwood

It was great to read Spa Business’ article on cancer awareness, as the industry needs to be more proactive in this area. The UK’s SpaBreaks.com says at least 50 people a week are refused treatment.

We’ve provided treatments and products to people going through cancer since 2003 and insurance isn’t an issue. Not ‘badging’ treatments as ‘cancer-friendly’ has also ensured that customers don’t feel singled out.

In 2008, we launched the Made for Life Foundation which offers Cancer Touch Therapy training and this is where we’ve faced the biggest barriers.

Colleges have a fear-induced, blanket ‘no’ policy which is challenging. But we’re making in-roads and have started work with the London School of Beauty & Make Up and are launching at Clyde College soon.

Like Wellness for Cancer, our biggest concern is cheap, one day courses.

It took 18 months to research, develop, certify and accredit our three-day programme. All students learn to adapt treatments for individuals, while having clarity around contraindications. They’re also coached through medical jargon and get hands-on experience. All crucial elements which you simply cannot cover in just one day.

Benchmarks around education may help, but these would need to be regulated by an independent body. But it’s a potential solution for those who want to make a positive change.

www.madeforlife.org/

 


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24 Apr 2019 Spa Business: uniting the world of wellness
 
 
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SELECTED ISSUE
Spa Business
2018 issue 4

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Spa Business -



Letters


Do you have a strong opinion, or disagree with somebody else’s point of view on topics related to the spa industry? If so, Spa Business would love to hear from you. Email your letters, thoughts and suggestions to theteam@spabusiness.com

‘Well-washing’ confusing developers and consumers
Ingo Schweder, Managing Director, Horwath HTL Health and Wellness
Ingo Schweder

I was interested to see Spa Business’ latest feature on the growth of wellness rooms in hotels last issue. Although brands from Marriott, to Hilton to InterContinental are increasingly incorporating elements of wellness in their hotels, an all-encompassing offering tends to be overlooked.

To place the health and wellbeing of wellness travellers at centre stage, today’s hospitality operators are required to think one step ahead. When developing a wellness-centric property, hospitality experts have to take into account the choice of materials, colour and textures, use of biophilic design standards, incorporation of nature into overall architecture, and creating social spaces that inspire connections and engagement.

To adhere to the core principles of wellness travel – to proactively maintain or improve personal health and wellness – results-driven, multi-day programmes are also necessary.

The handful of true wellness resorts which do exist, however, demonstrate that there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach. Some specialise in a single treatment modality, while others offer a multifaceted approach. Some offer general pampering packages, while others focus on serious, health-focused programmes.

In a new white paper – Wellness-Themed vs Wellness Hospitality – the Horwath HTL Health and Wellness team from Bangkok identifies true wellness resorts and compares them to wellness-themed hotels. It also clarifies key industry terms and sets standards for the wellness hospitality industry because the reality is that merely highlighting healthy features or amenities is ‘well-washing’ and confuses developers and consumers alike.

To download a full copy of the report, visit www.horwathhtl.com/publications/

Short cancer therapy courses are concerning
Amanda Winwood, owner, Made for Life Organics
Amanda Winwood

It was great to read Spa Business’ article on cancer awareness, as the industry needs to be more proactive in this area. The UK’s SpaBreaks.com says at least 50 people a week are refused treatment.

We’ve provided treatments and products to people going through cancer since 2003 and insurance isn’t an issue. Not ‘badging’ treatments as ‘cancer-friendly’ has also ensured that customers don’t feel singled out.

In 2008, we launched the Made for Life Foundation which offers Cancer Touch Therapy training and this is where we’ve faced the biggest barriers.

Colleges have a fear-induced, blanket ‘no’ policy which is challenging. But we’re making in-roads and have started work with the London School of Beauty & Make Up and are launching at Clyde College soon.

Like Wellness for Cancer, our biggest concern is cheap, one day courses.

It took 18 months to research, develop, certify and accredit our three-day programme. All students learn to adapt treatments for individuals, while having clarity around contraindications. They’re also coached through medical jargon and get hands-on experience. All crucial elements which you simply cannot cover in just one day.

Benchmarks around education may help, but these would need to be regulated by an independent body. But it’s a potential solution for those who want to make a positive change.

www.madeforlife.org/


Originally published in Spa Business 2018 issue 4

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd