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Mother & Baby spas
Latching on

A new generation of women is redefining motherhood. Mari Stevens investigates the opportunity for spas to nurture this continually rejuvenating market of new mums – and their babies

By Mari Stevens | Published in Spa Business 2012 issue 3


Despite the range of pre-natal treatments available, spas have been slow to cater for women in their ‘fourth trimester’. Traditionally, new mums have lacked time and money to spa, and find it hard to leave their babies for what can be perceived as an indulgence. Baby care is also an issue for spas – babies don’t square easily with most spas’ brand image. However, today’s mums are more financially independent and independent-minded than ever before, forcing the industry to look for ways to embrace this market and their newborns.

TODAY’S MOTHERS
According to The New Demographics of Motherhood report, one in seven babies in the US is born to a mother who is 35+. These women are increasingly well-educated and highly paid – 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics show that almost 40 per cent of working wives in the US now out-earn their husbands and the Synovate Women’s Financial Independence global survey showed that 58 per cent of women across 12 diverse countries now believe themselves to be financially independent. Not only does this make a practical difference, it marks a cultural shift as women choose not to be defined by motherhood.

But there’s an added dimension. Today’s mothers are unlikely to receive medical care post-natally and more likely to suffer from post-natal depression. Mintel research shows that 82 per cent of UK mums return to work after having children, while The Changing Face of Motherhood Survey found that 64 per cent of UK mums say they lack ‘me time’. Worldwide traditions of post-natal wellness have not translated to modern western medicine. As Faridah Ahmad Fadzil, managing director of Tanamera Spa – a chain of ladies-only spas in Malaysia (see p46) – explains: “Imagine this: after being seen for months by doctors, you’re told to go home after birth and come back in six weeks. There’s a general lack of attention given to this sector and spas should create specialised programmes for new mothers and give them the support system they desperately need.”

WHAT MOTHERS WANT
All these factors provide fertile territory, but along with better qualifications, jobs and salaries come higher expectations. “I set up Cupcake Mum after seeing so many friends with lovely lives taking part in baby classes on dirty church hall floors,” says Karen Hastings, founder of the two family-focused Cupcake clubs and spas in London (see p46). New mothers expect quality without compromise, as indicated by the growth in luxury spas catering for them – including Cupcake’s own award-winning facilities and other resorts such as Schloss Elmau, Bavaria.

But welcoming mums without adjusting a spa menu isn’t enough. New mothers have specific physical requirements and carefully tailored programmes are needed. “Part of the reason we launched a New Mother programme was to educate mothers – to stop them from booking a treatment that might not be suitable for their situation,” explains Fabrizio Castellani, spa manager at Lefay Resort & Spa (see p44) near Lake Garda, Italy, which has packaged a range of ‘safe’ treatments for new mums, all making use of natural products that are suitable when breastfeeding. Flexibility is also vital and Lefay’s method is to provide a bespoke programme of treatments based on in-depth energy interviews with a spa doctor.

A handful of other European spas offer programmes combining specific and generic treatments too including Italy’s Lake Iseo which has a Remise-En-Forme package featuring anti-cellulite, abdominal and tonifying sessions. In La Baule, France, the thalassotherapy centre based in the Hotel Royal-Thalasso Barrière (see sb07/1 p62) has a programme which includes perineum muscle physiotherapy and vein treatments alongside more traditional spa therapies.

A key additional factor is that mothers, despite being out of the workplace, are still very busy. Independent mindbodysoul’s mummy and baby spa (in partnership with Aveda) in London has responded to this challenge by introducing short treatments for mums, some using two therapists for speed. Indeed, mums are so busy that it’s argued that pure indulgence in itself is a key health requirement for this market. The Changing Face of Motherhood Survey states that “mothers actually need at least four times more ‘me’ time than they currently get every day in order to feel happier and more fulfilled.” In these circumstances, some spa experts argue that a mother is better off leaving her baby at home.

However, some mothers are not just unable – but unwilling – to leave their newborn. Paula Gallardo, founder of Mamaheaven yoga retreats, with five locations in the UK, says: “We found that although they were often encouraged to do so by family and society, they didn’t want to leave their babies for long periods of time.” Proving the tangible benefit of a treatment is one way of persuading a mother to do so. The alternative is to provide high-quality childcare or involving the baby in the experience.

WELCOMING MUM – AND BABY
Babies are certainly welcome at some of the new niche day spas opening in response to this demand such as Itsy Bitsy Baby Spa, North Carolina and Belly Up Spa, Colorado. Independent mindbodysoul even offers mums a travel cot in the treatment room. Spas catering to broader markets and nervous about impacting on other clients might consider creating designated mother and baby areas within the spa such the Mother/Baby Institute at Thermes de Spa, Belgium; or making clever use of off-peak periods like Le Petit Spa, Vancouver which has created Mom and Baby Wednesdays.

Some providers, especially in Europe, do not see a contradiction. Lefay Resort & Spa welcomes babies and children to use its spa pools and even provides spa robes for kids. French spas in particular – including Thermes Marins de Saint-Malo, Relais Thalasso Ile de Ré and Royal-Thalasso Barrière – offer mother and baby programmes with tailored hydrotherapy treatments, swimming lessons and massage sessions for the youngest possible clients. These aren’t trivial extras. Mums are happier in the knowledge that both she and the baby are getting something from the experience. “Baby massage releases oxytosin, helping the baby to relax, sleep and feed better and it can also help a mum struggling with post-natal depression,” explains Gayle Berry of the Blossom and Berry baby-massage training company in the UK. Indeed, involving a baby not only benefits both mum and baby, it can also benefit a spa. It can be used to redefine your business, open your door to a generation of new customers, and reinvigorate your brand with life, vibrancy and optimism.

Every mum, baby and spa is different and latching on to this market offers unique challenges: there is a need for intimacy and sensitivity, a bespoke approach, attention to detail and flexibility. But it also provides an opportunity to nurture the future and grow a new generation of customers.

CASE STUDY 1

Lefay Resort & Spa

Nestled high on a mountainside overlooking Lake Garda in Italy, the tranquil Lefay Resort & Spa seems an unlikely place to find a stressed-out mum and her baby. The five-star resort, rub by the Leali family, offers top-quality facilities to a market of high-earning professional couples seeking relaxation.

Despite the serenity, families – seen as a key market – are also embraced. There are two spacious family suites, a baby-sitting service and a children’s mini-club. In the sophisticated spa, families mingle comfortably with others. “We’ve made a conscious decision to include families,” says spa manager, Fabrizio Castellani. “We get some complaints, of course, but not many.”

Lefay’s 3000sq m (32,292sq ft) spa is at the heart of the complex, and business. Off season (November to March), guests come specifically to use the facilities – the indoor and outdoor salt-water pools, five saunas; grotto; relaxation and wellness zones; fitness trails etc – or to experience its signature Lefay Spa Method programme combining Chinese medicine and western scientific research.

More traditional pre and post-natal programmes launched in 2011 in response to demand. These have since been merged into one New Mother programme involving an olive oil massage, facial cleansing, a light legs massage and targeted personal training. Alternatively, the Lefay Spa Method also tackles signs of post-natal depression.

First-person experience: Mari Stevens
After spending a few days with a six-month-old baby at Lefay, my impression is that the complex has an unstuffy and relaxed atmosphere, and family needs are seamlessly incorporated in the restaurants, rooms and spa, without too much impact on other guests.

I certainly felt revitalised by my stay and would even say that it could have a life-changing impact a on a new mother enabling her to experience bespoke physical and psychological care, eat healthy food, sleep well and spend quality time alone and with her baby.

This type of experience shouldn’t be underestimated and its long-term benefit for spas shouldn’t be either. As a busy, high-earning mum the chance to return to familiar surroundings, revisit a wonderful experience – and take advantage of that crèche – will be very tempting for me in three years’ time.

 



Families mix comfortably with leisure guests at Lefay – even in the spa
CASE STUDY 2

Spa Evian Source, Evian


The iconic French resort of Evian sees itself as the origin of mother and baby spa programmes in Europe. Such packages were launched at the Les Thermes Evian in 1987 and are now offered by other local spas, including Spa Evian Source at the Hôtel Royal.

Spa Evian Source’s Mother-Baby programme offers a new mother, and her three to 10 month old baby, a three or five day package designed by paediatric and obstetric professionals to help her rediscover her figure, recover physically and mentally from childbirth and share baby bonding experiences through baby swimming and massage. The balanced, holistic programme also offers beauty therapy, relaxation and alternative medical treatments such as lymphatic drainage, osteopathy and clay massage and a vital opportunity to socialise and share advice with other mums and spa professionals.

The hotel takes its commitment to babies very seriously too with a 4000sq m (43,056sq ft) crèche and activity centre for four-month+ children and a well-thought-out, free baby welcome package including basic equipment, such as a cot and bath-time equipment, breastfeeding chair, bath thermometer and even sterilising tablets.

New mothers and their babies are seen as a primary target market for the resort’s spa. Coupled with the resorts world-famous bottled Evian water – renowned for its energising powers – and nurturing image it all makes real business sense.

 



Three- and five-day packages have been designed by paediatric and obstetric experts

CASE STUDY 3

 

Fadzil’s programmes are a modern take on traditional Malay confinement practices
 
Faridah Ahmad Fadzil Managing director

Malays give a lot of emphasis to pre and post-natal treatment and it’s proven that women who diligently follow the traditional Malay confinement practices or ‘pantang’ will regain their pre-pregnancy figure, health and energy levels. A 100 per cent recovery is expected after 100 days. Malaysia also has one of the lowest rates of post-natal depression.

Confinement practices include the use of herbs internally and externally – such as on the abdomen to promote blood circulation and for firming. Heat is also key and a hot river stone or ‘bertungku’ is thought to help break down fats and shrink the womb.

Another feature is a traditional post-natal massage to promote blood circulation and lift the womb. An abdominal wrap or ‘bengkung’ is also worn for 44 days to shrink the uterus, flatten the stomach, promote good posture while breastfeeding and prevent overeating.

Tanamera recognised the need to revive these practices. We started to train therapists in the art of post-natal care and included it on our spa menu. We offer daily, five- and 10-day recovery programmes in the spa and at home. Our recovery programme features traditional post-natal massage; herbal vaginal steaming, and binding the abdominal area. Our Tanamera post-natal natural product range includes a Feminine Herbal Wash and Cotton Abdominal Binder.

There’s been a lot of interest from Asian countries such as Vietnam, which has a regime of traditional post-natal care, while in the US we’re targeting the doula network and in the Middle East we’re focusing on post-natal wellness clinics due to the conservative nature of the market.

We feel that the opportunities are endless and what’s wonderful is that we also feel as if we’re doing the community service by directing new mothers towards recovery and their future wellbeing.


we’re doing the community a service by redirecting new mothers towards their recovery and their future wellbeing

Managing director, Tanamera Spa; and president, Malaysia Association of Wellness and Spa

CASE STUDY 4

 

Karen Hastings
 
Karen Hastings Founder Cupcake Mum Limited, London

Launched Cupcake after realising there was a gap in the market for somewhere for new mothers, who were used to living full lives, to go with their babies to meet other people, take part in classes and relax. Our focus is on community, wellbeing and indulgence and our activities cover everything from pilates to ‘mumpreneur’ seminars and book clubs. We also offer a huge range of children’s activities, all in one family membership package.

A spa has always been a central aspect of our brand. Many of our clients were spa-goers before becoming mothers and see it as a necessity. Our focus group research shows that a mother has difficulty simply getting her legs waxed – so we offer a 20 minute slots but with luxury touches, such as hot stones. We also offer first-class crèche facilities. Our bespoke treatments have been developed with industry experts – we work with an osteopath and our specialist pregnancy massages take place on hydrotherapy beds.

We’re hoping to take our spa offering to a new level and have just set up a partnership with Pinks Boutique, an luxury, organic professional spa brand that uses products made by hand – a mother has a more heightened interest in the products she puts on her skin. The average age of a typical Cupcake mum is 36, so anti-ageing treatments and products are popular too.


a spa has always been central to our brand. many of our clients were spa-goers before becoming mothers and see it as a necessity

 



Hastings’ spas also focus on community and give mothers a chance to meet other people and relax
Cupcake Mum offers an appealing alternative for baby classes which usually take place in community facilities
Today’s mums are more financially dependent and want a high-end experience
Offering first-class facilities for children will make a spa more appealing to mothers
France’s Evian resort has offered mother and baby packages since 1987 and its still a strong market today
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Mother & Baby spas
Latching on

A new generation of women is redefining motherhood. Mari Stevens investigates the opportunity for spas to nurture this continually rejuvenating market of new mums – and their babies

By Mari Stevens | Published in Spa Business 2012 issue 3


Despite the range of pre-natal treatments available, spas have been slow to cater for women in their ‘fourth trimester’. Traditionally, new mums have lacked time and money to spa, and find it hard to leave their babies for what can be perceived as an indulgence. Baby care is also an issue for spas – babies don’t square easily with most spas’ brand image. However, today’s mums are more financially independent and independent-minded than ever before, forcing the industry to look for ways to embrace this market and their newborns.

TODAY’S MOTHERS
According to The New Demographics of Motherhood report, one in seven babies in the US is born to a mother who is 35+. These women are increasingly well-educated and highly paid – 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics show that almost 40 per cent of working wives in the US now out-earn their husbands and the Synovate Women’s Financial Independence global survey showed that 58 per cent of women across 12 diverse countries now believe themselves to be financially independent. Not only does this make a practical difference, it marks a cultural shift as women choose not to be defined by motherhood.

But there’s an added dimension. Today’s mothers are unlikely to receive medical care post-natally and more likely to suffer from post-natal depression. Mintel research shows that 82 per cent of UK mums return to work after having children, while The Changing Face of Motherhood Survey found that 64 per cent of UK mums say they lack ‘me time’. Worldwide traditions of post-natal wellness have not translated to modern western medicine. As Faridah Ahmad Fadzil, managing director of Tanamera Spa – a chain of ladies-only spas in Malaysia (see p46) – explains: “Imagine this: after being seen for months by doctors, you’re told to go home after birth and come back in six weeks. There’s a general lack of attention given to this sector and spas should create specialised programmes for new mothers and give them the support system they desperately need.”

WHAT MOTHERS WANT
All these factors provide fertile territory, but along with better qualifications, jobs and salaries come higher expectations. “I set up Cupcake Mum after seeing so many friends with lovely lives taking part in baby classes on dirty church hall floors,” says Karen Hastings, founder of the two family-focused Cupcake clubs and spas in London (see p46). New mothers expect quality without compromise, as indicated by the growth in luxury spas catering for them – including Cupcake’s own award-winning facilities and other resorts such as Schloss Elmau, Bavaria.

But welcoming mums without adjusting a spa menu isn’t enough. New mothers have specific physical requirements and carefully tailored programmes are needed. “Part of the reason we launched a New Mother programme was to educate mothers – to stop them from booking a treatment that might not be suitable for their situation,” explains Fabrizio Castellani, spa manager at Lefay Resort & Spa (see p44) near Lake Garda, Italy, which has packaged a range of ‘safe’ treatments for new mums, all making use of natural products that are suitable when breastfeeding. Flexibility is also vital and Lefay’s method is to provide a bespoke programme of treatments based on in-depth energy interviews with a spa doctor.

A handful of other European spas offer programmes combining specific and generic treatments too including Italy’s Lake Iseo which has a Remise-En-Forme package featuring anti-cellulite, abdominal and tonifying sessions. In La Baule, France, the thalassotherapy centre based in the Hotel Royal-Thalasso Barrière (see sb07/1 p62) has a programme which includes perineum muscle physiotherapy and vein treatments alongside more traditional spa therapies.

A key additional factor is that mothers, despite being out of the workplace, are still very busy. Independent mindbodysoul’s mummy and baby spa (in partnership with Aveda) in London has responded to this challenge by introducing short treatments for mums, some using two therapists for speed. Indeed, mums are so busy that it’s argued that pure indulgence in itself is a key health requirement for this market. The Changing Face of Motherhood Survey states that “mothers actually need at least four times more ‘me’ time than they currently get every day in order to feel happier and more fulfilled.” In these circumstances, some spa experts argue that a mother is better off leaving her baby at home.

However, some mothers are not just unable – but unwilling – to leave their newborn. Paula Gallardo, founder of Mamaheaven yoga retreats, with five locations in the UK, says: “We found that although they were often encouraged to do so by family and society, they didn’t want to leave their babies for long periods of time.” Proving the tangible benefit of a treatment is one way of persuading a mother to do so. The alternative is to provide high-quality childcare or involving the baby in the experience.

WELCOMING MUM – AND BABY
Babies are certainly welcome at some of the new niche day spas opening in response to this demand such as Itsy Bitsy Baby Spa, North Carolina and Belly Up Spa, Colorado. Independent mindbodysoul even offers mums a travel cot in the treatment room. Spas catering to broader markets and nervous about impacting on other clients might consider creating designated mother and baby areas within the spa such the Mother/Baby Institute at Thermes de Spa, Belgium; or making clever use of off-peak periods like Le Petit Spa, Vancouver which has created Mom and Baby Wednesdays.

Some providers, especially in Europe, do not see a contradiction. Lefay Resort & Spa welcomes babies and children to use its spa pools and even provides spa robes for kids. French spas in particular – including Thermes Marins de Saint-Malo, Relais Thalasso Ile de Ré and Royal-Thalasso Barrière – offer mother and baby programmes with tailored hydrotherapy treatments, swimming lessons and massage sessions for the youngest possible clients. These aren’t trivial extras. Mums are happier in the knowledge that both she and the baby are getting something from the experience. “Baby massage releases oxytosin, helping the baby to relax, sleep and feed better and it can also help a mum struggling with post-natal depression,” explains Gayle Berry of the Blossom and Berry baby-massage training company in the UK. Indeed, involving a baby not only benefits both mum and baby, it can also benefit a spa. It can be used to redefine your business, open your door to a generation of new customers, and reinvigorate your brand with life, vibrancy and optimism.

Every mum, baby and spa is different and latching on to this market offers unique challenges: there is a need for intimacy and sensitivity, a bespoke approach, attention to detail and flexibility. But it also provides an opportunity to nurture the future and grow a new generation of customers.

CASE STUDY 1

Lefay Resort & Spa

Nestled high on a mountainside overlooking Lake Garda in Italy, the tranquil Lefay Resort & Spa seems an unlikely place to find a stressed-out mum and her baby. The five-star resort, rub by the Leali family, offers top-quality facilities to a market of high-earning professional couples seeking relaxation.

Despite the serenity, families – seen as a key market – are also embraced. There are two spacious family suites, a baby-sitting service and a children’s mini-club. In the sophisticated spa, families mingle comfortably with others. “We’ve made a conscious decision to include families,” says spa manager, Fabrizio Castellani. “We get some complaints, of course, but not many.”

Lefay’s 3000sq m (32,292sq ft) spa is at the heart of the complex, and business. Off season (November to March), guests come specifically to use the facilities – the indoor and outdoor salt-water pools, five saunas; grotto; relaxation and wellness zones; fitness trails etc – or to experience its signature Lefay Spa Method programme combining Chinese medicine and western scientific research.

More traditional pre and post-natal programmes launched in 2011 in response to demand. These have since been merged into one New Mother programme involving an olive oil massage, facial cleansing, a light legs massage and targeted personal training. Alternatively, the Lefay Spa Method also tackles signs of post-natal depression.

First-person experience: Mari Stevens
After spending a few days with a six-month-old baby at Lefay, my impression is that the complex has an unstuffy and relaxed atmosphere, and family needs are seamlessly incorporated in the restaurants, rooms and spa, without too much impact on other guests.

I certainly felt revitalised by my stay and would even say that it could have a life-changing impact a on a new mother enabling her to experience bespoke physical and psychological care, eat healthy food, sleep well and spend quality time alone and with her baby.

This type of experience shouldn’t be underestimated and its long-term benefit for spas shouldn’t be either. As a busy, high-earning mum the chance to return to familiar surroundings, revisit a wonderful experience – and take advantage of that crèche – will be very tempting for me in three years’ time.

 



Families mix comfortably with leisure guests at Lefay – even in the spa
CASE STUDY 2

Spa Evian Source, Evian


The iconic French resort of Evian sees itself as the origin of mother and baby spa programmes in Europe. Such packages were launched at the Les Thermes Evian in 1987 and are now offered by other local spas, including Spa Evian Source at the Hôtel Royal.

Spa Evian Source’s Mother-Baby programme offers a new mother, and her three to 10 month old baby, a three or five day package designed by paediatric and obstetric professionals to help her rediscover her figure, recover physically and mentally from childbirth and share baby bonding experiences through baby swimming and massage. The balanced, holistic programme also offers beauty therapy, relaxation and alternative medical treatments such as lymphatic drainage, osteopathy and clay massage and a vital opportunity to socialise and share advice with other mums and spa professionals.

The hotel takes its commitment to babies very seriously too with a 4000sq m (43,056sq ft) crèche and activity centre for four-month+ children and a well-thought-out, free baby welcome package including basic equipment, such as a cot and bath-time equipment, breastfeeding chair, bath thermometer and even sterilising tablets.

New mothers and their babies are seen as a primary target market for the resort’s spa. Coupled with the resorts world-famous bottled Evian water – renowned for its energising powers – and nurturing image it all makes real business sense.

 



Three- and five-day packages have been designed by paediatric and obstetric experts

CASE STUDY 3

 

Fadzil’s programmes are a modern take on traditional Malay confinement practices
 
Faridah Ahmad Fadzil Managing director

Malays give a lot of emphasis to pre and post-natal treatment and it’s proven that women who diligently follow the traditional Malay confinement practices or ‘pantang’ will regain their pre-pregnancy figure, health and energy levels. A 100 per cent recovery is expected after 100 days. Malaysia also has one of the lowest rates of post-natal depression.

Confinement practices include the use of herbs internally and externally – such as on the abdomen to promote blood circulation and for firming. Heat is also key and a hot river stone or ‘bertungku’ is thought to help break down fats and shrink the womb.

Another feature is a traditional post-natal massage to promote blood circulation and lift the womb. An abdominal wrap or ‘bengkung’ is also worn for 44 days to shrink the uterus, flatten the stomach, promote good posture while breastfeeding and prevent overeating.

Tanamera recognised the need to revive these practices. We started to train therapists in the art of post-natal care and included it on our spa menu. We offer daily, five- and 10-day recovery programmes in the spa and at home. Our recovery programme features traditional post-natal massage; herbal vaginal steaming, and binding the abdominal area. Our Tanamera post-natal natural product range includes a Feminine Herbal Wash and Cotton Abdominal Binder.

There’s been a lot of interest from Asian countries such as Vietnam, which has a regime of traditional post-natal care, while in the US we’re targeting the doula network and in the Middle East we’re focusing on post-natal wellness clinics due to the conservative nature of the market.

We feel that the opportunities are endless and what’s wonderful is that we also feel as if we’re doing the community service by directing new mothers towards recovery and their future wellbeing.


we’re doing the community a service by redirecting new mothers towards their recovery and their future wellbeing

Managing director, Tanamera Spa; and president, Malaysia Association of Wellness and Spa

CASE STUDY 4

 

Karen Hastings
 
Karen Hastings Founder Cupcake Mum Limited, London

Launched Cupcake after realising there was a gap in the market for somewhere for new mothers, who were used to living full lives, to go with their babies to meet other people, take part in classes and relax. Our focus is on community, wellbeing and indulgence and our activities cover everything from pilates to ‘mumpreneur’ seminars and book clubs. We also offer a huge range of children’s activities, all in one family membership package.

A spa has always been a central aspect of our brand. Many of our clients were spa-goers before becoming mothers and see it as a necessity. Our focus group research shows that a mother has difficulty simply getting her legs waxed – so we offer a 20 minute slots but with luxury touches, such as hot stones. We also offer first-class crèche facilities. Our bespoke treatments have been developed with industry experts – we work with an osteopath and our specialist pregnancy massages take place on hydrotherapy beds.

We’re hoping to take our spa offering to a new level and have just set up a partnership with Pinks Boutique, an luxury, organic professional spa brand that uses products made by hand – a mother has a more heightened interest in the products she puts on her skin. The average age of a typical Cupcake mum is 36, so anti-ageing treatments and products are popular too.


a spa has always been central to our brand. many of our clients were spa-goers before becoming mothers and see it as a necessity

 



Hastings’ spas also focus on community and give mothers a chance to meet other people and relax
Cupcake Mum offers an appealing alternative for baby classes which usually take place in community facilities
Today’s mums are more financially dependent and want a high-end experience
Offering first-class facilities for children will make a spa more appealing to mothers
France’s Evian resort has offered mother and baby packages since 1987 and its still a strong market today
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Amra Skincare has positioned itself at the forefront of dermatological science and introduced its Micro-Cellular Actives line – a range of innovative molecular agents formulated to redefine the brand’s clinically-driven skincare applications for unparalleled results. [more...]
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Book4Time Inc.

Founded in 2004, Book4Time is a global leader in spa, wellness and leisure activity management solut [more...]
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DIARY

 

14-15 Apr 2024

Natural & Organic Products Europe

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22-24 Apr 2024

UK Aufguss Championships

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