GET SPA BUSINESS
magazine
Yes! Send me the FREE digital editions of Spa Business and Spa Business insider magazines and the FREE weekly Spa Business and Spa Business insider ezines and breaking news alerts!
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Q&A
Mia Kyricos

The Ecosystem of Wellbeing is a new protocol developed and trademarked by Kyricos and Associates and designed to give a framework for the development and delivery of wellness interventions. Spa Business finds out more from the company’s founder


What’s changing at Kyricos & Associates?
The essence of our business hasn’t changed, but the approach has. I like to think it’s changed with the times, but the reality is, it’s been informed by my personal learnings advising on wellness strategies for organisations of all kinds.

We need to move beyond products, services and programmes and think strategically and holistically – to make wellness a part of how companies and organisations behave and operate, not just what they offer.

For example, it’s not only about hotels offering spa and wellness treatments to guests but also about the example GMs and corporate leaders set, how they operate, source and recruit talent and deliver experiences. It’s also about how they show up and give back to their communities and their overall impact on the planet.

With this lens, we’re changing the way we support organisations that want to leverage wellness as a strategic differentiator and at the same time, impact the wellbeing of people, planet and community.

In my opinion, this is what’s expected of 21st century organisations. We call this approach the Ecosystem of Wellbeing and have recently trademarked this term.

What inspired you to create this new framework?
The pandemic was a time of great realisation and inspiration. I left a job, a company and a city I loved and returned to my own consultancy that, candidly, didn’t inspire me anymore.
I knew I had to rediscover my inspiration and work through some personal disappointment, which involved everything from deepening my meditation practice and prioritising the things in life that give me the greatest joy, to researching crazy concepts such as love as a business strategy – which I would later learn was not so crazy, hence my title change to ‘chief love officer’

I had to step back from the world in order to see it more clearly. I watched, listened and learned how people and communities responded to everything from COVID-19 to the death of George Floyd and renewed corporate efforts to make diversity and inclusion a strategic priority.

A lightbulb went off when I added these observations to my professional experiences creating and implementing wellness brands and products or workplace wellness programmes within largely unwell systems. I realised we need to look at wellness systemically, not just symptomatically.

Why did you register your proprietary process?
I’m purpose-driven, which is not always a good thing because I’m in the habit of freely sharing what I later learn was pioneering. I had a team to help me; a brand strategist who illustrated Ecosystem of Wellbeing as an infinity symbol, which I thought was genius and when I shared it with our website manager he suggested I meet with a trademark lawyer, saying “you’ve articulated what I’d failed to understand until this moment and I think the world will want to copy you.”

I realised the concept may be easy to understand, but actualising it is a greater challenge, which is where our proprietary thinking and my experience working in the corporate and consulting worlds come in.

Our brand manager says, “Kyricos is the special sauce and our “associates” are who help us to scale, so we hope, over time, to guide our associate network around the world to identify and activate Ecosystems of Wellbeing, so we can oversee and make systems well together.

How will it change your work?
It will expand its scope and the business impact we create for companies. We’re changing mindsets in terms of how people perceive wellness and wellbeing, so we stand to reduce costs by streamlining resources, products and programmes that have historically been siloed, while increasing brand awareness and the overall appeal of companies, both internally and externally.

Who will it benefit?
For companies serious about making wellbeing part of their DNA, it presents a strategic approach to wellness that supports business and brand objectives.

If companies are wishing to address leadership, employee, consumer or even community wellness, it gives them a point-of-entry into a wider ecosystem they often don’t realise exists. For others who may have failed or had fleeting success with the launch of wellness-driven programmes, products and/or services, it gives an objective lens to reevaluate, evolve and deepen the potential for success. It’s a tool from which we can teach and learn because every company, every organisation – even every city and country – has an Ecosystem of Wellbeing that’s unique to them.

How happily does wellness sit with commercialism?
The answer is profoundly simple: it comes down to the authenticity of leadership. I ask leaders all the time if they’re trying to “tick the box” by offering a wellness-driven product, service or programme, or if they really want to change their companies for the better? Either answer is OK, but they need to be honest with themselves from the start.

We should stop feeling ashamed about making money. On the contrary, doing good often comes at a cost, so why not reward companies and organisations that do this while also caring for the wellbeing of people, community and planet?

The key to success and the future of work will be more about how we work than what we do or even where we do it from.

You’re suggesting executives spend time on their wellbeing…
If we only focus on challenges and stress, it becomes self-defeating because we ultimately grow what we feed.

Leaders who don’t personally identify or practice wellness are the ones that don’t understand it, or who secretly don’t believe in it, while publicly being responsible for its success. In both cases, they’re just setting themselves up to fail.

My advice is to find a wellness ‘religion’ of some kind. It doesn’t matter if it’s spiritual, emotional, physical, mental or financial. It doesn’t matter what time of day it’s practised, or for how long, just that it’s identified, respected and practised every day. If you look to the world’s most successful leaders and happiest individuals, you’ll find they have wellness practices they’re religious about and regularly share, publicly.

Do we have to accept wellness is for the privileged?
This is such an important question and one that those in the business of wellness have either complicated or neglected because it comes down to the environment required for our wellness to thrive.

For example, it’s impossible to think about being mindful or taking time to connect with loved ones or even eating or sleeping well when we’re worried about food or shelter. It’s difficult to take advantage of a workplace wellness programme or a free meditation app when you don’t feel included, seen or supported at work, or safe in the community where you live.

We have to remember that wellness is personal and the path to wellbeing is dependent on environmental factors inside and outside our control, both at work and in life.

We have to get real about the factors that affect personal health and wellbeing in order to refine what we offer, to whom and how. Only then will we stand to make wellness more equitable and achievable for all.

Can the wellness market be sustainable?
This comes down to the ‘how’ for every single company, community, industry or even country. All it takes is one thing: intention.

Just think about how far we’ve come. I grew up in the 70s and 80s, and we never talked about caring for people or the planet in the context of business – and if we’re being honest, some people and organisations weren’t even doing this by 2019.

But the world has changed, and the worst thing we can do at this point is to have collective amnesia. We can and should do better.

For me, it’s as simple as being conscious and having the intention to leave the world a better place, which I genuinely feel is a responsibility for us all.

How is your new framework being received?
Answering this question makes me emotional because the response has been overwhelmingly positive. I’ve been contacted by people from all over the world and all walks of life who identify with the Ecosystem of Wellbeing in some way, or who’ve shared how it’s helping them to see the world of wellness, and their part in it, much more clearly.

Over time, organisations of all kinds will engage with it. This will lead to more data being shared, more positive outcomes and more learnings that will help us guide others to do the same. Perhaps the model will even be taught in business schools one day.

The goal is to guide organisations who want to support people and the planet Credit: Photo: shutterstock/BGStock
Companies have woken up to the many benefits of a corporate wellness plan Credit: Photo: shutterstock/Monkey Business Images
Companies should get serious about making wellbeing part of their DNA Credit: Photo: shutterstock/Jacob Lund
Ecosystem of Wellbeing™ Credit: Kyricos & Associates
Prioritise things that make you happy, says Kyricos Credit: Photo: shutterstock/Jacob Lund
FEATURED SUPPLIERS

Book4Time teams up with Gantner to offer spas access control solutions
Book4Time has recently announced a new partnership with hardware-based, access control company Gantner. [more...]

How EverySkin increased revenue by going digital with Zenoti
Premium aesthetics spa brand EverySkin wanted to offer guests a modern, digital experience across their six locations – but they were struggling to find the right tools. [more...]
+ More featured suppliers  
COMPANY PROFILES
The Wellness

Guaranteeing economic success for our customers - as well as the ultimate wellness experience for th [more...]
Art of Cryo

Art of Cryo offers a wide range of treatment solutions for whole-body cryo. [more...]
+ More profiles  
CATALOGUE GALLERY
 

+ More catalogues  

VIDEO GALLERY

Sommerhuber GmbH - Ceramic heated LOUNGER ONE PLUS - ultimate relaxation
Lounger One Plus is characterized by an organic aesthetic, delicate contours and an ideal lying comfort. Comfortable ergonomically shaped Heat Storing Ceramics nestle the skin and provide for perfect relaxation – touchless enjoyment meeting the highest hygiene standards. Find out more...
+ More videos  

DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

12-13 Sep 2022

2022 Salt Therapy Association Conference

Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
12-14 Sep 2022

Spa Life Ireland

Galgorm Spa & Golf Resort , Ballymena, Ireland
+ More diary  
 
ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
 
SPA BUSINESS
SPA OPPORTUNITIES
SPA BUSINESS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2022
News   Products   Magazine
Q&A
Mia Kyricos

The Ecosystem of Wellbeing is a new protocol developed and trademarked by Kyricos and Associates and designed to give a framework for the development and delivery of wellness interventions. Spa Business finds out more from the company’s founder


What’s changing at Kyricos & Associates?
The essence of our business hasn’t changed, but the approach has. I like to think it’s changed with the times, but the reality is, it’s been informed by my personal learnings advising on wellness strategies for organisations of all kinds.

We need to move beyond products, services and programmes and think strategically and holistically – to make wellness a part of how companies and organisations behave and operate, not just what they offer.

For example, it’s not only about hotels offering spa and wellness treatments to guests but also about the example GMs and corporate leaders set, how they operate, source and recruit talent and deliver experiences. It’s also about how they show up and give back to their communities and their overall impact on the planet.

With this lens, we’re changing the way we support organisations that want to leverage wellness as a strategic differentiator and at the same time, impact the wellbeing of people, planet and community.

In my opinion, this is what’s expected of 21st century organisations. We call this approach the Ecosystem of Wellbeing and have recently trademarked this term.

What inspired you to create this new framework?
The pandemic was a time of great realisation and inspiration. I left a job, a company and a city I loved and returned to my own consultancy that, candidly, didn’t inspire me anymore.
I knew I had to rediscover my inspiration and work through some personal disappointment, which involved everything from deepening my meditation practice and prioritising the things in life that give me the greatest joy, to researching crazy concepts such as love as a business strategy – which I would later learn was not so crazy, hence my title change to ‘chief love officer’

I had to step back from the world in order to see it more clearly. I watched, listened and learned how people and communities responded to everything from COVID-19 to the death of George Floyd and renewed corporate efforts to make diversity and inclusion a strategic priority.

A lightbulb went off when I added these observations to my professional experiences creating and implementing wellness brands and products or workplace wellness programmes within largely unwell systems. I realised we need to look at wellness systemically, not just symptomatically.

Why did you register your proprietary process?
I’m purpose-driven, which is not always a good thing because I’m in the habit of freely sharing what I later learn was pioneering. I had a team to help me; a brand strategist who illustrated Ecosystem of Wellbeing as an infinity symbol, which I thought was genius and when I shared it with our website manager he suggested I meet with a trademark lawyer, saying “you’ve articulated what I’d failed to understand until this moment and I think the world will want to copy you.”

I realised the concept may be easy to understand, but actualising it is a greater challenge, which is where our proprietary thinking and my experience working in the corporate and consulting worlds come in.

Our brand manager says, “Kyricos is the special sauce and our “associates” are who help us to scale, so we hope, over time, to guide our associate network around the world to identify and activate Ecosystems of Wellbeing, so we can oversee and make systems well together.

How will it change your work?
It will expand its scope and the business impact we create for companies. We’re changing mindsets in terms of how people perceive wellness and wellbeing, so we stand to reduce costs by streamlining resources, products and programmes that have historically been siloed, while increasing brand awareness and the overall appeal of companies, both internally and externally.

Who will it benefit?
For companies serious about making wellbeing part of their DNA, it presents a strategic approach to wellness that supports business and brand objectives.

If companies are wishing to address leadership, employee, consumer or even community wellness, it gives them a point-of-entry into a wider ecosystem they often don’t realise exists. For others who may have failed or had fleeting success with the launch of wellness-driven programmes, products and/or services, it gives an objective lens to reevaluate, evolve and deepen the potential for success. It’s a tool from which we can teach and learn because every company, every organisation – even every city and country – has an Ecosystem of Wellbeing that’s unique to them.

How happily does wellness sit with commercialism?
The answer is profoundly simple: it comes down to the authenticity of leadership. I ask leaders all the time if they’re trying to “tick the box” by offering a wellness-driven product, service or programme, or if they really want to change their companies for the better? Either answer is OK, but they need to be honest with themselves from the start.

We should stop feeling ashamed about making money. On the contrary, doing good often comes at a cost, so why not reward companies and organisations that do this while also caring for the wellbeing of people, community and planet?

The key to success and the future of work will be more about how we work than what we do or even where we do it from.

You’re suggesting executives spend time on their wellbeing…
If we only focus on challenges and stress, it becomes self-defeating because we ultimately grow what we feed.

Leaders who don’t personally identify or practice wellness are the ones that don’t understand it, or who secretly don’t believe in it, while publicly being responsible for its success. In both cases, they’re just setting themselves up to fail.

My advice is to find a wellness ‘religion’ of some kind. It doesn’t matter if it’s spiritual, emotional, physical, mental or financial. It doesn’t matter what time of day it’s practised, or for how long, just that it’s identified, respected and practised every day. If you look to the world’s most successful leaders and happiest individuals, you’ll find they have wellness practices they’re religious about and regularly share, publicly.

Do we have to accept wellness is for the privileged?
This is such an important question and one that those in the business of wellness have either complicated or neglected because it comes down to the environment required for our wellness to thrive.

For example, it’s impossible to think about being mindful or taking time to connect with loved ones or even eating or sleeping well when we’re worried about food or shelter. It’s difficult to take advantage of a workplace wellness programme or a free meditation app when you don’t feel included, seen or supported at work, or safe in the community where you live.

We have to remember that wellness is personal and the path to wellbeing is dependent on environmental factors inside and outside our control, both at work and in life.

We have to get real about the factors that affect personal health and wellbeing in order to refine what we offer, to whom and how. Only then will we stand to make wellness more equitable and achievable for all.

Can the wellness market be sustainable?
This comes down to the ‘how’ for every single company, community, industry or even country. All it takes is one thing: intention.

Just think about how far we’ve come. I grew up in the 70s and 80s, and we never talked about caring for people or the planet in the context of business – and if we’re being honest, some people and organisations weren’t even doing this by 2019.

But the world has changed, and the worst thing we can do at this point is to have collective amnesia. We can and should do better.

For me, it’s as simple as being conscious and having the intention to leave the world a better place, which I genuinely feel is a responsibility for us all.

How is your new framework being received?
Answering this question makes me emotional because the response has been overwhelmingly positive. I’ve been contacted by people from all over the world and all walks of life who identify with the Ecosystem of Wellbeing in some way, or who’ve shared how it’s helping them to see the world of wellness, and their part in it, much more clearly.

Over time, organisations of all kinds will engage with it. This will lead to more data being shared, more positive outcomes and more learnings that will help us guide others to do the same. Perhaps the model will even be taught in business schools one day.

The goal is to guide organisations who want to support people and the planet Credit: Photo: shutterstock/BGStock
Companies have woken up to the many benefits of a corporate wellness plan Credit: Photo: shutterstock/Monkey Business Images
Companies should get serious about making wellbeing part of their DNA Credit: Photo: shutterstock/Jacob Lund
Ecosystem of Wellbeing™ Credit: Kyricos & Associates
Prioritise things that make you happy, says Kyricos Credit: Photo: shutterstock/Jacob Lund
LATEST NEWS
Remembering Olivia Newton-John – a champion of wellness
Actress, singer and long-term wellness advocate, Dame Olivia Newton-John has died aged 73.
Stress-busting sound wellness treatments debut at Kimpton Charlotte Square Hotel
The wild sounds of the natural world have been captured to create the Swell Room, a new sound wellness room at the Kimpton Charlotte Square Hotel in Edinburgh
Smoke cleansing rituals inspire Brush Creek Ranch’s newly refreshed spa in Wyoming
The Lodge & Spa at Brush Creek Ranch in Saratoga, Wyoming, has opened the doors to its newly renovated spa and wellness centre.
Arch Amenities Group acquires pool management and construction company
Arch Amenities Group (AAG) has acquired US-based pool construction and management company NYS Pool Management.
Soneva Soul launches London Wellness Specialist Network
Barefoot luxury hotel and wellness brand Soneva has announced the launch of the London Wellness Specialist Network as part of its new transformative wellness concept, called Soneva Soul.
The Ranch shares plans for nature-centric retreat in New York’s Hudson Valley
US-based luxury health and wellness brand The Ranch is going to launch its first East Coast destination in the Lower Hudson Valley near Tuxedo Park, New York.
Fritz Lanman appointed CEO at Mindbody
Mindbody has announced that Fritz Lanman will become the company’s new CEO from 3 September 2022. He will succeed Josh McCarter who will join Mindbody’s board of directors.
Philips partners with Nowatch to create cortisol monitor to help people control stressful 'fight or flight' response
Nowatch, a new contender in the expanding biometric fitness tracker market has developed a wearable device, in partnership with Philips, which measures cortisol levels and alerts users about their stress load up to 60 minutes in advance..
Ursula Levine named head of medical services at Lanserhof at The Arts Club
Lanserhof at The Arts Club, Mayfair, London has appointed Dr Ursula Levine as the new head of medical services, effective from August 2022.
Amazon gets into wellness – acquires One Medical in US$3.9bn deal
Amazon has acquired primary healthcare organisation One Medica in a US$3.9bn deal that will see it moving further into the wellness market.
Clinique La Prairie to debut in China in 2023 as part of global rollout strategy
Swiss health and medical spa operator Clinique La Prairie (CLP) is planning to open a health resort in Anji, China, in partnership with Sunjoy Group.
Caroline Mahe-Lea to succeed Marian Harvey as Thalgo Group UK general manager
French marine skincare brand Thalgo has named Caroline Mahe-Lea as the new general manager of its UK branch. She will step up to the role in July after Marian Harvey retires after 38 years in the position.
+ More news   
 
FEATURED SUPPLIERS

Book4Time teams up with Gantner to offer spas access control solutions
Book4Time has recently announced a new partnership with hardware-based, access control company Gantner. [more...]

How EverySkin increased revenue by going digital with Zenoti
Premium aesthetics spa brand EverySkin wanted to offer guests a modern, digital experience across their six locations – but they were struggling to find the right tools. [more...]
+ More featured suppliers  
COMPANY PROFILES
The Wellness

Guaranteeing economic success for our customers - as well as the ultimate wellness experience for th [more...]
+ More profiles  
CATALOGUE GALLERY
+ More catalogues  

VIDEO GALLERY

Sommerhuber GmbH - Ceramic heated LOUNGER ONE PLUS - ultimate relaxation
Lounger One Plus is characterized by an organic aesthetic, delicate contours and an ideal lying comfort. Comfortable ergonomically shaped Heat Storing Ceramics nestle the skin and provide for perfect relaxation – touchless enjoyment meeting the highest hygiene standards. Find out more...
+ More videos  

DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

12-13 Sep 2022

2022 Salt Therapy Association Conference

Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
12-14 Sep 2022

Spa Life Ireland

Galgorm Spa & Golf Resort , Ballymena, Ireland
+ More diary  
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2022

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS