Company profile: KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG | spabusiness.com
Gold COMPANY PROFILE

KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG

Contact  |  Updates  |  Brochure
KLAFS sauna on Aida Nova
Steam Bath at Coral Spa Adams Beach Hotel
ICE LOUNGE at Der Birkenhof Spa & Genuss Resort, Image source: Germann Popp
Background
Founded in 1928, KLAFS is known as an award winning, world-leading trendsetter in wellness and spa.

The company is recognised as offering innovative, one-stop solutions for unique spa design and custom-made products.

With a focus on sustainability and eco-friendliness, KLAFS is a reliable partner for residential and commercial clients globally.

Main products and services
KLAFS scope of work includes the following:
■ Spa design and consultancy
With an experienced international in-house team of architects and designers KLAFS offers innovative, bespoke spa design and technical consultancy to turn every spa vision into a unique reality.

■ Custom-made products “made in germany”
KLAFS’ product range includes custom-made and prefabricated thermal spa equipment offering wellbeing products from -15°C to +100°C, such as saunas, infrared cabins, steamrooms, hamams, ice and snow rooms and solutions for relaxation and treatment areas.

■ Supply and installation
With well-trained and experienced in-house project and assembly teams, KLAFS guarantees to implement even the most exclusive and ambitious spa globally.

Additional services
KLAFS offers worldwide after-sales service and maintenance following project completion, with on-site service provided by members of the company’s global sales and service partner network who are trained in KLAFS’ in-house academy.

With its own in-house R&D department, KLAFS can fulfil even the most extraordinary customer request, ranging from a single cabin to a complete turnkey project.

USPs
KLAFS keeps a close eye on the global spa and wellness market to spot and set trends. Innovation is a key part of the company’s corporate philosophy and KLAFS introduces suprising new concepts for the health and spa industry with pleasing regularity.

Working with renowned designers, architects and hospitals worldwide, KLAFS is able to develop innovative and beautiful products and concepts continuously. Examples include the Sauna S1 – the first extendible sauna – and the medical-based KLAFS Microsalt system.

This commitment to innovation is proven by the numerous yearly awards won by the company, such as the gold iF Product Design Award, the Red Dot Design Award and the Interior Innovation Award.

Where in the world?
Headquartered in Germany, KLAFS has subsidiaries in Austria, Switzerland, Hong Kong, UK and the Netherlands, as well as 60 sales and service partners worldwide. The company serves the entire wellness and spa industry worldwide.

case study: Anything but standard: ESPA at Mondrian Doha (Qatar)
The opulent design of the ESPA equipped by KLAFS is based on local influences as well as innovative materials and techniques. Each area has its own identity, its own story, which combines to create an anthology of wonderful tales. Marcel Wander’s - the hotel's architect - signature style is felt everywhere – from the hotel’s lobby and restaurants to the suites and spa area. Tailored designs reflect native patterns, Arabic script and historic souqs.

Total area: 1,950 m² on three levels. Separate ladies’ and men’s spa, each with a spacious Turkish bath, two steam baths, sauna, wet massage room with SPAVITAL STONE, mud bath and POLARIS ice fountain. Mixed spa area: sauna, steam bath and SNOW PARADISE. VIP private spa with generous steam shower. Pool area with four LINEA heated loungers.

Read more here
case study: Full of tradition and ahead of its time: Tierra Santa Healing House at Faena Hotel (USA)
The Tierra Santa Healing House represents a conscious departure from the previous American understanding of a spa, which is equated with the aspects of cosmetic applications and massages. In the Faena however, the guests will find a facility that offers all major spa traditions – the Scandinavian sauna tradition, the Roman tradition of the steam bath and the Oriental tradition of the hammam – in a luxurious, extravagant setting.

Total surface area: 180 m². Wellness area with hammam, steam bath, sauna, tepidarium, SNOW PARADISE, waterfall showers. The sauna impresses guests with three extravagant characteristics – organically curved loungers, a wall covering made of large-scale panels and a rear wall artfully constructed of numerous slats.

Read more here
case study: A wealth of ideas that feel good: Adler Wellness at Hotel-Gasthof ADLER (Germany)
The owner family is already running the ‘Adler’ in the fourth generation and combines traditional and modern harmoniously in one place with a certain flair. Plenty of wood and fine natural materials create a rustic, cosy charm. The omnipresent eagle coat of arms and old photographs allude to the long history of the ‘Adler’.

Total area: 300 m². Infrared room, lounge, relaxation room with an open fireplace, steam bath, SANARIUM® with Adler branding, sauna with a multimedia-system ATMOSPHERE by KLAFS, experience showers, STALAGMITE ice fountain.

Refined design elements surprise guests at different points in the wellness area. For example, there is the glass partition between the two saunas, colourfully illuminated three-dimensional coffers or the cascade infusion heater with panelling that alludes to the structure of stacked firewood – an element that pervades the entire wellness area.
KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG brochure:
Download this brochure
Who's who
Gernot Mang, managing director
Phillip Rock, managing director
Thorsten Bichler, group director of international sales
Andreas Erke, head of interior design
Top clients
Euphoria Retreat, Greece; ESPA at Mondrian Hotel, Qatar; Faena Hotel, USA; Four Seasons Hotel, China; The Dolder Grand, Switzerland; Zvezdnoe Nebo, Republic of Crimea.
updates & press releases
12 Apr 2022
INTERVIEW WITH PROF. DR. MED. RESCH: AFTER TWO YEARS OF THE PANDEMIC: A NEW ROLE FOR SAU- NAS!
Professor Resch, in April 2020, shortly after the start of the coronavirus pandemic, we interviewed you about the potential preventive effects of saunas and salt inhalation with respect to the virus. Since then, almost two years have passed...

... yes, and for two years those of us working in science and politics have been in constant firefighting mode. However, to stick with that metaphor, I would add that we don’t use the big hose all of the time. Over time, we’ve learned a lot about the virus, how it operates and how we can protect ourselves.

So how can we protect ourselves?

At first, it was unclear how much of a danger this virus posed. Today we know that younger people’s immune systems are generally very good at fending off attacks by these corona viruses. Older people, on the other hand, as well as people with quite common pre-existing conditions and especially people with a compromised immune system, were at risk – and they still are.

What implications does that have for the individual?

Let me make a comparison with a risk that, to some extent, we’re all capable of assessing: road traffic accidents. Statistically speaking, for people up to the age of 40, the risk of dying of COVID-19 in the last two years was just a tenth of the risk due to road traffic accidents, whereas for people over 50 it was 25 times as high. In other words, as many people over the age of 50 have died of coronavirus in the last two years as have in the last 25 years due to road traffic accidents.

Why is that?

It’s very easy to point to the cause: the immune system. But explaining why is a bit more complicated. When it comes to our immune system, nature has equipped us with two different weapons to defend ourselves against all different kinds of intruders: harmful substances, pollen, bacteria and of course viruses.

How do viruses work?

Viruses are not alive and cannot reproduce by themselves. We’re all familiar with “computer viruses” – small, malicious pieces of software that are harmless as long as they don’t get onto a computer. Infected computers “propagate” these viruses by copying the malicious software and thereby infecting other computers.
In fact, coronaviruses are essentially also just a piece of malicious software surrounded by a shell. On this shell are “keys” – that is, the all-too-familiar spikes seen in illustrations of the virus. These keys allow it to open a gateway – known as a “receptor” in technical terms – on the surface of cells, e.g. in the nose, throat or lungs. The malicious software can then pass into the cell, where it infects the production facilities for building blocks that cells normally use to repair themselves or to form new cells. From that point onward, these facilities only build new viruses. This is unfortunately a very effective strategy, such that every infected cell produces thousands of copies of the virus within a few hours and releases them into its surroundings, where the same fate befalls neighbouring cells.

Are there some viruses that are more dangerous than others?

With some viruses, this “production” inside the cells causes them to die off. If a large number of cells die, it can render an entire organ unusable – in the case of SARS-CoV-2, for example, this can happen to the lungs, which can then no longer absorb enough oxygen from inhaled air. With some viruses, the infected cells can still emit a chemical messenger. This warns specific immune cells that then rush to the scene in order to eat up the infected cells together with their viral contents, thereby rendering them harmless. In some circumstances, however, the immune system can go into a panic, attacking everything and even destroying the body’s own cells indiscriminately on a massive scale. This is what happens in serious cases of COVID-19.

So the immune system actually protects the body. Can it be made “fitter”?

Usually, yes. However, as I had to put in no uncertain terms two years ago – and again a year ago – things work differently in the case of SARS-CoV-2. This is because the strength of a per- son’s own immune system is nowhere near sufficient. It’s as if an athletic person were to trust that regular training would make their biceps so strong that they no longer needed to wear a seatbelt in cars and that, instead, they could simply brace themselves using their arms in the event of a collision. To begin with, as part of our immune systems, we all have a “rapid reaction force” – cells that disarm anything that attempts to invade the body. This is something we’re born with and is therefore known as the “innate immune system”. Over the course of our lives, these immune cells pass information about intruders on to the second part: our acquired immune system. This uses the relayed information to “build” tailor-made weapons against the current threat. Known as antibodies, these weapons identify intruders based on specific features and envelop them so that they cannot do any more harm. Adults in particular seem to have so many specific defensive weapons against all manner of attackers “in stock” that the “rapid reaction force” of the innate immune system is rarely needed and therefore reacts rather sluggishly.

Does it make sense, therefore, to deliberately train the innate immune system in older people?

Yes, and that’s why I see the situation very differently today! In the first 11⁄2 years, a SARS-CoV-2 infection was the first ever contact between this type of viruses and a person’s own immune system. Whatever the innate immune system couldn’t render harmless immediately after an infection enjoyed relatively free rein within the body for a period of about two weeks. In this time, many infected people had already seen their state of health deteriorate to the extent that they required treatment in an intensive care unit or even artificial respiration. Now, however, most of Germany’s population has a very well-trained “acquired immune system” after receiving two or three vaccinations. Moreover, in a growing number of people, the acquired immune system has also been and continues to be trained due to infections with SARS- CoV-2 itself. The time therefore seems to have come when we have a good chance of doing something to help the innate immune system – the icing on the cake, so to speak.

Might saunas be the trick you have up your sleeve?

Precisely! We now know not only that the regular, correct use of saunas has been shown to offer pretty much the best protection against all kinds of colds, but also that – in the case of SARS-CoV-2 regular saunas are probably also a very effective method of sprucing up the innate immune system and keeping it fighting fit. You may have noticed that I just used the word “regular” twice in one sentence. As with any kind of training, regularity is the key to success. With this in mind, having your own sauna at home is perhaps the most important prerequisite for many people to successfully ward off a multitude of diseases that we al- most inevitably come into contact with, particularly in the cold season. What’s more, and this is also very important, you needn’t even focus on working towards the paramount objective of “toughening up” the immune system. Rather, there is a reward every time: a cleansing of residual metabolites from the entire body and the replenishment of a wide range of important building materials for the regeneration of organs and tissues! And, of course, it also provides an opportunity for deep physical and mental relaxation.
11 Mar 2022
Repeatedly awarded: KLAFS is one of the brands of the century
KLAFS has been awarded as a “Brand of the Century” for the third time in a row. The world leader on the sauna market thus once again makes it into the renowned illustrated book of the ZEIT publishing group “German Standards – Brands of the Century 2022”, which presents almost 200 outstanding brands.

Following the awards in 2016 and 2019, KLAFS lines up in 2022 alongside other successful companies in the famous brand book as a strong leading brand for this third time. The evaluation of the award winners is both transparent and proactive. Moreover, the awards handed out are deliberately restricted to one brand per product type.

“We’re delighted to be one of the Brands of the Century. That’s a great success for the whole KLAFS team! Numerous “brands for life” can again be found in the illustrated book. Which also explains why we are so proud of this award. Because not only is KLAFS a brand for life, but a sauna from KLAFS is also a decision for life,” summarises Gernot Mang, managing director of KLAFS.

Precisely because well-being, regeneration and a sense of security are so highly prized within our own four walls in times like these, KLAFS is delighted about this award, as it demonstrates enduring brand leadership. Because the more pressured time gets and the more is demanded of us, the more precious are the moments when you can leave the world behind for a while – and make it wait. KLAFS develops its products not only according to the highest quality, longevity and aesthetics, but always in line with people’s needs, demands and living realities. That’s how the name KLAFS has not only became a globally appreciated brand, but is synonymous with a contemporary and health-orientated lifestyle, and KLAFS is inseparably associated with saunas.

01 Mar 2022
Regular saunas can extend your lifespan
For some time, the motivation for enjoying regular saunas has gone beyond simply maintaining general well-being and the popular “wellness factor”. Dr Brenke is convinced that regular use can even help people avoid some visits to the doctor. One interesting observation from Brenke’s research is the thermal adaptability of the body, as well as the resulting long-term reduction in core body temperature.

After just a few weeks, regular sauna users sweat more healthily and efficiently than they did at the outset. These individuals also take longer to get cold in winter and suffer less from the heat in summer. In this context, the body intensifies its ability to give off heat over time: after just ten saunas, the skin temperature increases due to stronger circulation. Not only does this improve heat emission, but the resulting reduction in insulation by the body shell also leads to a long-term drop in core body temperature due to regular sessions of heating and sweating in the sauna.

Although the study participants saw their core body temperature fall to 0.5°C below the set point within just a few weeks, they did not perceive this externally, such as by feeling cold or shivering. Rather, the new set point simply established itself on a lasting basis once the process of thermal adaptation was complete. “A core body temperature that is 0.5°C lower would result in at least a five-year increase in life expectancy. If you began the process of thermal adaptation in middle age, you could still expect an increase of two to three years,” explains Dr Brenke.

Thermal adaptation in sauna users due to the alternating stimuli allows various ageing processes to be slowed down, so to speak: just as most vital functions are temperature-dependent, heat also has a general accelerating effect on many processes, and cold can also have a decelerating effect. In order to achieve the described health effects, it’s crucial to heat the sauna up to 90°C and to shower in cold water. Lastly, regular sauna use reduces core body temperature and bolsters the body’s own defence mechanisms. “Japanese studies have shown that the vasodilatory effect of the alternating hot/cold stimuli in sauna therapy counteracts the development of arteriosclerosis. Moreover, lower core body temperature leads to reduced formation of free radicals. Statistically, this reduced load of free radicals on the body can in turn be a reason for longer life – because these species accelerate the ageing process in the body. In recent years, there has been a growing volume of international findings to indicate that repeated heat applications – in a sauna, for example – tip the balance between processes in which free radicals are formed and their opponents in favour of the opponents. At the same time, the classical sauna consisting of two or three sessions lasting 10–15 minutes each is the most effective way of toughening up the body. Exposure to hot air followed by subsequent cooling is vital in order to dilate the blood vessels – in other words, the long-term effect relies on the alternating hot/cold stimuli. The body temperature falls after just a few months, while the skin temperature increases and the body begins to toughen up,” says Brenke.

These positive effects can be obtained very easily with the help of a sauna installed within your own four walls. As the global market leader for saunas, pools and spas, KLAFS offers attractive sauna and wellness solutions for every living environment. Accordingly, nothing stands in your way when it comes to enjoying regular and soothing sessions to increase the body’s resistance – or a moment of respite for the soul – in your own home. With design solutions to suit every space, the home sauna becomes your own private fountain of health and youth.

For many years, Dr Rainer Brenke served as head physician for natural remedies at Hufeland- Klinik Bad Ems. Before that, he carried out years of research at Berlin’s Charité hospital, including on the subject of saunas. He is now living in Berlin again and devotes his time to further education and training
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KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG
Tel: +49 (0)791 501 0
Address: Erich-Klafs-Str. 1-3, Schwäbisch Hall, 74523, Germany
Thorsten Bichler, director international sales
 
Who's who
Gernot Mang, managing director
Phillip Rock, managing director
Thorsten Bichler, group director of international sales
Andreas Erke, head of interior design
Top clients
Euphoria Retreat, Greece; ESPA at Mondrian Hotel, Qatar; Faena Hotel, USA; Four Seasons Hotel, China; The Dolder Grand, Switzerland; Zvezdnoe Nebo, Republic of Crimea.
KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG brochure:
 
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News   Products   Magazine
Gold COMPANY PROFILE

KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG

Contact  |  Updates  |  Brochure
KLAFS sauna on Aida Nova
Steam Bath at Coral Spa Adams Beach Hotel
ICE LOUNGE at Der Birkenhof Spa & Genuss Resort, Image source: Germann Popp
Background
Founded in 1928, KLAFS is known as an award winning, world-leading trendsetter in wellness and spa.

The company is recognised as offering innovative, one-stop solutions for unique spa design and custom-made products.

With a focus on sustainability and eco-friendliness, KLAFS is a reliable partner for residential and commercial clients globally.

Main products and services
KLAFS scope of work includes the following:
■ Spa design and consultancy
With an experienced international in-house team of architects and designers KLAFS offers innovative, bespoke spa design and technical consultancy to turn every spa vision into a unique reality.

■ Custom-made products “made in germany”
KLAFS’ product range includes custom-made and prefabricated thermal spa equipment offering wellbeing products from -15°C to +100°C, such as saunas, infrared cabins, steamrooms, hamams, ice and snow rooms and solutions for relaxation and treatment areas.

■ Supply and installation
With well-trained and experienced in-house project and assembly teams, KLAFS guarantees to implement even the most exclusive and ambitious spa globally.

Additional services
KLAFS offers worldwide after-sales service and maintenance following project completion, with on-site service provided by members of the company’s global sales and service partner network who are trained in KLAFS’ in-house academy.

With its own in-house R&D department, KLAFS can fulfil even the most extraordinary customer request, ranging from a single cabin to a complete turnkey project.

USPs
KLAFS keeps a close eye on the global spa and wellness market to spot and set trends. Innovation is a key part of the company’s corporate philosophy and KLAFS introduces suprising new concepts for the health and spa industry with pleasing regularity.

Working with renowned designers, architects and hospitals worldwide, KLAFS is able to develop innovative and beautiful products and concepts continuously. Examples include the Sauna S1 – the first extendible sauna – and the medical-based KLAFS Microsalt system.

This commitment to innovation is proven by the numerous yearly awards won by the company, such as the gold iF Product Design Award, the Red Dot Design Award and the Interior Innovation Award.

Where in the world?
Headquartered in Germany, KLAFS has subsidiaries in Austria, Switzerland, Hong Kong, UK and the Netherlands, as well as 60 sales and service partners worldwide. The company serves the entire wellness and spa industry worldwide.

case study: Anything but standard: ESPA at Mondrian Doha (Qatar)
The opulent design of the ESPA equipped by KLAFS is based on local influences as well as innovative materials and techniques. Each area has its own identity, its own story, which combines to create an anthology of wonderful tales. Marcel Wander’s - the hotel's architect - signature style is felt everywhere – from the hotel’s lobby and restaurants to the suites and spa area. Tailored designs reflect native patterns, Arabic script and historic souqs.

Total area: 1,950 m² on three levels. Separate ladies’ and men’s spa, each with a spacious Turkish bath, two steam baths, sauna, wet massage room with SPAVITAL STONE, mud bath and POLARIS ice fountain. Mixed spa area: sauna, steam bath and SNOW PARADISE. VIP private spa with generous steam shower. Pool area with four LINEA heated loungers.

Read more here
case study: Full of tradition and ahead of its time: Tierra Santa Healing House at Faena Hotel (USA)
The Tierra Santa Healing House represents a conscious departure from the previous American understanding of a spa, which is equated with the aspects of cosmetic applications and massages. In the Faena however, the guests will find a facility that offers all major spa traditions – the Scandinavian sauna tradition, the Roman tradition of the steam bath and the Oriental tradition of the hammam – in a luxurious, extravagant setting.

Total surface area: 180 m². Wellness area with hammam, steam bath, sauna, tepidarium, SNOW PARADISE, waterfall showers. The sauna impresses guests with three extravagant characteristics – organically curved loungers, a wall covering made of large-scale panels and a rear wall artfully constructed of numerous slats.

Read more here
case study: A wealth of ideas that feel good: Adler Wellness at Hotel-Gasthof ADLER (Germany)
The owner family is already running the ‘Adler’ in the fourth generation and combines traditional and modern harmoniously in one place with a certain flair. Plenty of wood and fine natural materials create a rustic, cosy charm. The omnipresent eagle coat of arms and old photographs allude to the long history of the ‘Adler’.

Total area: 300 m². Infrared room, lounge, relaxation room with an open fireplace, steam bath, SANARIUM® with Adler branding, sauna with a multimedia-system ATMOSPHERE by KLAFS, experience showers, STALAGMITE ice fountain.

Refined design elements surprise guests at different points in the wellness area. For example, there is the glass partition between the two saunas, colourfully illuminated three-dimensional coffers or the cascade infusion heater with panelling that alludes to the structure of stacked firewood – an element that pervades the entire wellness area.
KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG brochure:
Download this brochure
Who's who
Gernot Mang, managing director
Phillip Rock, managing director
Thorsten Bichler, group director of international sales
Andreas Erke, head of interior design
Top clients
Euphoria Retreat, Greece; ESPA at Mondrian Hotel, Qatar; Faena Hotel, USA; Four Seasons Hotel, China; The Dolder Grand, Switzerland; Zvezdnoe Nebo, Republic of Crimea.
updates & press releases
12 Apr 2022
INTERVIEW WITH PROF. DR. MED. RESCH: AFTER TWO YEARS OF THE PANDEMIC: A NEW ROLE FOR SAU- NAS!
Professor Resch, in April 2020, shortly after the start of the coronavirus pandemic, we interviewed you about the potential preventive effects of saunas and salt inhalation with respect to the virus. Since then, almost two years have passed...

... yes, and for two years those of us working in science and politics have been in constant firefighting mode. However, to stick with that metaphor, I would add that we don’t use the big hose all of the time. Over time, we’ve learned a lot about the virus, how it operates and how we can protect ourselves.

So how can we protect ourselves?

At first, it was unclear how much of a danger this virus posed. Today we know that younger people’s immune systems are generally very good at fending off attacks by these corona viruses. Older people, on the other hand, as well as people with quite common pre-existing conditions and especially people with a compromised immune system, were at risk – and they still are.

What implications does that have for the individual?

Let me make a comparison with a risk that, to some extent, we’re all capable of assessing: road traffic accidents. Statistically speaking, for people up to the age of 40, the risk of dying of COVID-19 in the last two years was just a tenth of the risk due to road traffic accidents, whereas for people over 50 it was 25 times as high. In other words, as many people over the age of 50 have died of coronavirus in the last two years as have in the last 25 years due to road traffic accidents.

Why is that?

It’s very easy to point to the cause: the immune system. But explaining why is a bit more complicated. When it comes to our immune system, nature has equipped us with two different weapons to defend ourselves against all different kinds of intruders: harmful substances, pollen, bacteria and of course viruses.

How do viruses work?

Viruses are not alive and cannot reproduce by themselves. We’re all familiar with “computer viruses” – small, malicious pieces of software that are harmless as long as they don’t get onto a computer. Infected computers “propagate” these viruses by copying the malicious software and thereby infecting other computers.
In fact, coronaviruses are essentially also just a piece of malicious software surrounded by a shell. On this shell are “keys” – that is, the all-too-familiar spikes seen in illustrations of the virus. These keys allow it to open a gateway – known as a “receptor” in technical terms – on the surface of cells, e.g. in the nose, throat or lungs. The malicious software can then pass into the cell, where it infects the production facilities for building blocks that cells normally use to repair themselves or to form new cells. From that point onward, these facilities only build new viruses. This is unfortunately a very effective strategy, such that every infected cell produces thousands of copies of the virus within a few hours and releases them into its surroundings, where the same fate befalls neighbouring cells.

Are there some viruses that are more dangerous than others?

With some viruses, this “production” inside the cells causes them to die off. If a large number of cells die, it can render an entire organ unusable – in the case of SARS-CoV-2, for example, this can happen to the lungs, which can then no longer absorb enough oxygen from inhaled air. With some viruses, the infected cells can still emit a chemical messenger. This warns specific immune cells that then rush to the scene in order to eat up the infected cells together with their viral contents, thereby rendering them harmless. In some circumstances, however, the immune system can go into a panic, attacking everything and even destroying the body’s own cells indiscriminately on a massive scale. This is what happens in serious cases of COVID-19.

So the immune system actually protects the body. Can it be made “fitter”?

Usually, yes. However, as I had to put in no uncertain terms two years ago – and again a year ago – things work differently in the case of SARS-CoV-2. This is because the strength of a per- son’s own immune system is nowhere near sufficient. It’s as if an athletic person were to trust that regular training would make their biceps so strong that they no longer needed to wear a seatbelt in cars and that, instead, they could simply brace themselves using their arms in the event of a collision. To begin with, as part of our immune systems, we all have a “rapid reaction force” – cells that disarm anything that attempts to invade the body. This is something we’re born with and is therefore known as the “innate immune system”. Over the course of our lives, these immune cells pass information about intruders on to the second part: our acquired immune system. This uses the relayed information to “build” tailor-made weapons against the current threat. Known as antibodies, these weapons identify intruders based on specific features and envelop them so that they cannot do any more harm. Adults in particular seem to have so many specific defensive weapons against all manner of attackers “in stock” that the “rapid reaction force” of the innate immune system is rarely needed and therefore reacts rather sluggishly.

Does it make sense, therefore, to deliberately train the innate immune system in older people?

Yes, and that’s why I see the situation very differently today! In the first 11⁄2 years, a SARS-CoV-2 infection was the first ever contact between this type of viruses and a person’s own immune system. Whatever the innate immune system couldn’t render harmless immediately after an infection enjoyed relatively free rein within the body for a period of about two weeks. In this time, many infected people had already seen their state of health deteriorate to the extent that they required treatment in an intensive care unit or even artificial respiration. Now, however, most of Germany’s population has a very well-trained “acquired immune system” after receiving two or three vaccinations. Moreover, in a growing number of people, the acquired immune system has also been and continues to be trained due to infections with SARS- CoV-2 itself. The time therefore seems to have come when we have a good chance of doing something to help the innate immune system – the icing on the cake, so to speak.

Might saunas be the trick you have up your sleeve?

Precisely! We now know not only that the regular, correct use of saunas has been shown to offer pretty much the best protection against all kinds of colds, but also that – in the case of SARS-CoV-2 regular saunas are probably also a very effective method of sprucing up the innate immune system and keeping it fighting fit. You may have noticed that I just used the word “regular” twice in one sentence. As with any kind of training, regularity is the key to success. With this in mind, having your own sauna at home is perhaps the most important prerequisite for many people to successfully ward off a multitude of diseases that we al- most inevitably come into contact with, particularly in the cold season. What’s more, and this is also very important, you needn’t even focus on working towards the paramount objective of “toughening up” the immune system. Rather, there is a reward every time: a cleansing of residual metabolites from the entire body and the replenishment of a wide range of important building materials for the regeneration of organs and tissues! And, of course, it also provides an opportunity for deep physical and mental relaxation.
11 Mar 2022
Repeatedly awarded: KLAFS is one of the brands of the century
KLAFS has been awarded as a “Brand of the Century” for the third time in a row. The world leader on the sauna market thus once again makes it into the renowned illustrated book of the ZEIT publishing group “German Standards – Brands of the Century 2022”, which presents almost 200 outstanding brands.

Following the awards in 2016 and 2019, KLAFS lines up in 2022 alongside other successful companies in the famous brand book as a strong leading brand for this third time. The evaluation of the award winners is both transparent and proactive. Moreover, the awards handed out are deliberately restricted to one brand per product type.

“We’re delighted to be one of the Brands of the Century. That’s a great success for the whole KLAFS team! Numerous “brands for life” can again be found in the illustrated book. Which also explains why we are so proud of this award. Because not only is KLAFS a brand for life, but a sauna from KLAFS is also a decision for life,” summarises Gernot Mang, managing director of KLAFS.

Precisely because well-being, regeneration and a sense of security are so highly prized within our own four walls in times like these, KLAFS is delighted about this award, as it demonstrates enduring brand leadership. Because the more pressured time gets and the more is demanded of us, the more precious are the moments when you can leave the world behind for a while – and make it wait. KLAFS develops its products not only according to the highest quality, longevity and aesthetics, but always in line with people’s needs, demands and living realities. That’s how the name KLAFS has not only became a globally appreciated brand, but is synonymous with a contemporary and health-orientated lifestyle, and KLAFS is inseparably associated with saunas.

01 Mar 2022
Regular saunas can extend your lifespan
For some time, the motivation for enjoying regular saunas has gone beyond simply maintaining general well-being and the popular “wellness factor”. Dr Brenke is convinced that regular use can even help people avoid some visits to the doctor. One interesting observation from Brenke’s research is the thermal adaptability of the body, as well as the resulting long-term reduction in core body temperature.

After just a few weeks, regular sauna users sweat more healthily and efficiently than they did at the outset. These individuals also take longer to get cold in winter and suffer less from the heat in summer. In this context, the body intensifies its ability to give off heat over time: after just ten saunas, the skin temperature increases due to stronger circulation. Not only does this improve heat emission, but the resulting reduction in insulation by the body shell also leads to a long-term drop in core body temperature due to regular sessions of heating and sweating in the sauna.

Although the study participants saw their core body temperature fall to 0.5°C below the set point within just a few weeks, they did not perceive this externally, such as by feeling cold or shivering. Rather, the new set point simply established itself on a lasting basis once the process of thermal adaptation was complete. “A core body temperature that is 0.5°C lower would result in at least a five-year increase in life expectancy. If you began the process of thermal adaptation in middle age, you could still expect an increase of two to three years,” explains Dr Brenke.

Thermal adaptation in sauna users due to the alternating stimuli allows various ageing processes to be slowed down, so to speak: just as most vital functions are temperature-dependent, heat also has a general accelerating effect on many processes, and cold can also have a decelerating effect. In order to achieve the described health effects, it’s crucial to heat the sauna up to 90°C and to shower in cold water. Lastly, regular sauna use reduces core body temperature and bolsters the body’s own defence mechanisms. “Japanese studies have shown that the vasodilatory effect of the alternating hot/cold stimuli in sauna therapy counteracts the development of arteriosclerosis. Moreover, lower core body temperature leads to reduced formation of free radicals. Statistically, this reduced load of free radicals on the body can in turn be a reason for longer life – because these species accelerate the ageing process in the body. In recent years, there has been a growing volume of international findings to indicate that repeated heat applications – in a sauna, for example – tip the balance between processes in which free radicals are formed and their opponents in favour of the opponents. At the same time, the classical sauna consisting of two or three sessions lasting 10–15 minutes each is the most effective way of toughening up the body. Exposure to hot air followed by subsequent cooling is vital in order to dilate the blood vessels – in other words, the long-term effect relies on the alternating hot/cold stimuli. The body temperature falls after just a few months, while the skin temperature increases and the body begins to toughen up,” says Brenke.

These positive effects can be obtained very easily with the help of a sauna installed within your own four walls. As the global market leader for saunas, pools and spas, KLAFS offers attractive sauna and wellness solutions for every living environment. Accordingly, nothing stands in your way when it comes to enjoying regular and soothing sessions to increase the body’s resistance – or a moment of respite for the soul – in your own home. With design solutions to suit every space, the home sauna becomes your own private fountain of health and youth.

For many years, Dr Rainer Brenke served as head physician for natural remedies at Hufeland- Klinik Bad Ems. Before that, he carried out years of research at Berlin’s Charité hospital, including on the subject of saunas. He is now living in Berlin again and devotes his time to further education and training
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KLAFS GmbH & Co. KG
Tel: +49 (0)791 501 0
Address: Erich-Klafs-Str. 1-3, Schwäbisch Hall, 74523, Germany
Thorsten Bichler, director international sales
 


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